Posts Tagged ‘Vampires’

With a Sunday respite from cold, cold weather last week, the Bloomington Writers Guild’s “First Sunday Prose Reading & Open Mic” (see December 4, et al.) had its 2018 start in a new and most likely temporary venue, the Monroe County Library Auditorium, due to the imminent closing of Boxcar Books.  The featured readers were speculative fiction writer and sometimes poet Darja Malcolm-Clarke with an excerpt from a story to bloomingtonwritersguildappear in SEE THE ELEPHANT magazine, “Wren’s Flight”; YA novelist Julia Karr with three short pieces based on prompts from a writing course several years back; and School of Education doctoral candidate Adam Henze with a group of fictionalized essays on various aspects of the teaching experience, including one in haibun form.  Snacks (to be eaten in the library’s atrium only) followed, leading into the open mike session with five readings, of which mine was third, “Midnight Sun,” a Christmas tale of zombies and vampirism in its own cold, cold weather setting, thus giving it a special relevance to the well below freezing previous few days.

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So as December fades into the new year, Daniel Kurland and BLOODY-DISGUSTING.COM have offered this interesting list:  “The 10 Best Foreign Horror Films of 2017.”  And the neat thing is, I’ve already seen and even reviewed one (Hi there, Indiana University Cinema!), Poland’s THE LURE, for which see below for April 25.  It’s fourth on the list for what that’s worth — the films aren’t overtly stated to be arranged from best to worst, or vice versa — sandwiched between Portugal with THE FOREST OF LOST SOULS and Mexico’s anthology movie MEXICO BARBARO II.  Last on the list is the Mexican/French WE ARE THE FLESH while the feature begins with Turkey’s THE HOUSEWIFE, with the remaining entries VERONICA (Mexico), COLD HELL (Germany), SALVATION (Spain), and DANUR: I CAN SEE GHOSTS and BADOET (both from Indonesia).  To see for oneself, with a photo (the one shown here, above, is from MEXICO BARBARO II) and a brief description for each, press here.

Word has come from Bards and Sages Publishing’s Julie Ann Dawson that THE SOCIETY OF MISFIT STORIES PRESENTS. . . VOLUME ONE (see December 9, October 16, et al.) has been nominated for Best Anthology in the 2017 Preditors and Editors Reader’s Poll.  Lead story in the volume happens to be by me, winning its spot as best of its year in THE SOCIETY OF MISFIT STORIES’ own poll, a fantasy mystery originally published in ALFRED HITCHCOCKS MYSTERY MAGAZINE titled “By Force and Against the King’s Peace.”  And so, if you voted for me or not, you can now vote for the entire anthology by pressing here.  (But beware if you do.  The announcement cautions that [u]nfortunately, the voting process is a little cumbersome.  Make sure to confirm your email address after voting so that the vote counts.  The good news is that you only need to confirm your address the first time.

Also, if you’d like to know more about THE SOCIETY OF MISFIT STORIES itself (or even possibly buy a copy of Volume 1 — just scroll on down the page until you come to a link), press here.

Two quick Saturday items, the first of which is the receipt of a large paperback copy of THE SOCIETY OF MISFIT STORIES PRESENTS. . . , VOLUME ONE.  This is the hard copy version of Bards and Sages Publishing’s first year’s collection of longer stories, that is ones hard to place in most electronic magazines, etc., because of their length.  And mine, “By Force and Against the King’s Peace,” a magical courtroom drama originally published in ALFRED HITCHCOCK’S MYSTERY MAGAZINE, appears first in the book, a result of it winning a readers poll in its electronic version (cf. October 16, January 19, et al.).  For more, one may press here.

Then today also marked the Bloomington Writers Guild’s Year End Party and Annual General Business Meeting Plus Open Mic, for which I presented orange slices for the pitch-in refreshments, and eight very recent, very short, epigrammatic poems for the readings.  One of which, “Wet Work,” was my most recently published poem in the current STAR*LINE (see December 2, et al.), while the others, thus far unpublished, were “From the Zombie Hunters Field Guide:  Tracking the Zombie,” “The Young Transylvanian’s Guide to Dating:  Taking Your Date Home,” “Never Trust a Vampiress,” “What She Learned,” “Oh No She Didn’t?,” “City of Angels,” and “Land of Milk and Honey.”

Two items today, the first that the current issue of STAR*LINE arrived Friday afternoon with a three-line mermaid-vampiress poem, “Wet Work,” by me on page 12.  Hidden, where one would not expect her, look for her down in the depths on the right.  STAR*LINE is the publication of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Poetry Association (SFPA) which also runs an annual Rhysling competition for speculative poetry.  More information on that and STAR*LINE can be found on their website by pressing here.

Then ASTOUNDING OUTPOST (for more on which see just below, December 1) announces that a Kindle edition of NEURAL NETS, UPLINKS, AND WETWARE is now up and on sale for 99 cents for a limited time.  They don’t say for how long the sale will last, so to take advantage one should press here now.  Also don’t forget you can vote for my story, “No Place to Hide,” by using the link in the post below and, as a bonus, as it’s third in the contents in the Kindle edition one can read it in its entirety in the sample pages at the Amazon site (much more readable there than in the original web publication, which one can also find linked to at the end of the post just below).

Today brings an email plus PDF proof from Editor Vince Gotera of the latest STAR*LINE for Fall 2017.  Please proof your piece(s) . . . as well as your listing(s) in the table of contents.  Could you please get back to me with any corrections ASAP?  In my case the page of interest is the twelfth with, sharing poems by Christine Sng and by R. Mac Jones, tucked neatly in at the bottom right my three-liner “Wet Work” (cf. October 13).  And this time, aha!, there was an error, one of the sort that would sneak past a computer spell-checker (whereas, ironically, the correct word might not).

So not to worry, I’ve sent back the change along with mailing and payment details.  More to come when the published issue arrives.

Nine days to Halloween — how time does fly!  So to anticipate the upcoming holiday, THE HORROR TREE has just posted an interview of me, a long one by Ruschelle Dillon which even includes a question, with picture, about the Goth Cat Triana (with mention as well of dear departed Wednesday).  Did you know both of them have their own web pages (look for their names under “Pages” to the right)?  Captain Kirk or Jean Luc Picard?  (Yes, that’s one of the questions, but how do the “Casket Girls” fit in?)  Meldings of horror, science fiction, and romance.  Art and Death. Which TOMBS tale was “honorable mentioned” in Circlet Press’s BEST FANTASTIC EROTICA 2007?  Inspirational kitties.  Novels-in-stories.  And what does Poe’s “Poetic Principle” have to do with it all?

These and more — you know the routine!  Some things secret, some better well known, but all of them open for readers’ enjoyment by pressing here.

Perpetual Motion Machine Publications has announced a Friday the Thirteenth sale, to be in effect the entire Friday the Thirteenth Holiday Weekend.  To quote their email:  We’re also celebrating this special day by marking all of our books in our webstore off by 13%.  Simply visit our webstore and enter code PMMP13 upon checkout.  We have . . . a lot of books available.  Please consider picking up one or two or twelve.  The discount code expires on Sunday.

That’s thirteen percent off today through Sunday by using the code PMMP13 when checking out, but more to the point one of the books you can get discounted is my Stoker Award(R) nominated collection THE TEARS OF ISIS.  To go to the PMMP site press here.  And, after you’ve added TEARS to your shopping “cart,” to order two or a dozen other titles click “SHOP” at the top which will bring you to a page for browsing through additional selections.

Friday the Thirteenth proper has revealed more good news too, at least so far.  At least from the writing standpoint, with a Friday publication of THREE DROPS FROM A CAULDRON, for Samhain 2017, by Britain’s Three Drops Press.  Although largely a book of poetry, my ingredient in the inculcation is a very short story, “School Nights,”* originally published in GOTHIC BLUE BOOK IV:  THE FOLKLORE EDITION (Burial Day Books, 2014, cf. October 29 2014, et al.), about a young girl who . . . well . . . learns.  The book itself can be read for free by pressing here, with instructions also for purchase of a 74-page paperback edition for $7.32.

Then, speaking of money, another royalty has been received with again, as is my custom, neither publisher or amount revealed to avoid embarrassment.  Nevertheless, had it not been paid via Paypal anyway, the check would have covered the cost to mail it with some cash left over.

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*Oddly enough, the title seems to have been omitted from the contents page.  Look for the “School Nights” on page 22, following “Vampire Girls” and “House of Horrors.”

Who knows what Friday the Thirteenth will bring, but yesterday, Thursday the twelfth, was rather nice despite a gloomy, Octobery day.  The highlight, a first poetry acceptance for me by STAR*LINE new editor Vince Gotera, for a “horrorku” titled “Wet Work.”  Horrorku?  Well, it’s sort of supposed to be horror plus haiku though it’s really more just a three line poem with a vaguely 5-7-5 syllable count (mine is 5-7-4) on a horror subject, which in my case would more likely be epigrammatic, although not always.  But to the point, even if lacking walruses (cf. October 1) “Wet Work” does have a mermaid.

Then Thursday night brought the Bloomington Writers Guild co-sponsored “Second Thursday Players Pub Spoken Word Series” (cf. June 8, et al.) with, this time, a special reading performance of PREMIUM TAFT, a two-act play by Tom Trent, with musical interludes by Jason Fickel.  PREMIUM TAFT is, to read from the Facebook description, “[a] fictional time-traveling comedy about William Howard Taft’s whistle-stop presidential campaign appearance at the Mitchell Opera House in 1908 . . .  or maybe 1958?”  Or science fiction meets farce, in this case with an Indiana small-town ambience with grifters, politicos, greed, and rock ‘n’ roll.  And lots of fun.

This was followed by “open mic” presentations of which mine came in fourth of six, to an audience of about 15 people.  Noting that it had been a gloomy, Octobery day, ideal as a precursor for Halloween, I read four poems from VAMPS (A RETROSPECTIVE), “Night Child,” “La Méduse,” “Moonlight Swimming,” and “Chagrin du Vampire.”




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