Posts Tagged ‘Horror’

So still not huge, but enough to purchase a modest dinner with maybe a glass of sweet tea on the side.  Thus, this the announcement from Editor “Mr. Deadman”:  It’s pay day. The royalties for CAMPFIRE TALES BOOK ONE comes to $96.00.  Split between the authors would mean $11.  CAMPFIRE TALES BOOK ONE gets hits every so often, and I’m actively promoting it via social network and writing groups.  . . .  Thank you all for considering Deadman’s Tome for CAMPFIRE TALES.  It was a different sort of animal, and the way CAMPFIRE TALES came to be was unusual.  I wish to work with you all in the future.

My story in this is “In The Octopus’s Garden” (see July 15, et al.), originally published in 69 FLAVORS OF PARANOIA, March-April 1999, and later lead story in my collection TEARS OF ISIS (for more on which, press its picture in the center column).  Also, for more on CAMPFIRE TALES BOOK ONE (yes, there’s a second book too, but that’s not the one that has my story), press here.

Then in other news, I’ve received the contract for “Got The Wash Day Blues” (see December 28), the tale of a laundry cop and a giant pile of animate dirty clothes, which has been signed and sent back late Thursday afternoon to Third Flatiron Publishing.  It will appear in their Spring anthology MONSTROSITIES to be published in March, more on which as it becomes available.

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It’s not an official nominee, that’s the first thing to say, but TOMBS:  A CHRONICLE OF LATTER-DAY TIMES OF EARTH has made the preliminary ballot from which the nominees will be selected.  Also, while TOMBS is a novel-in-stories, the ballot it’s on is for Superior Achievement in a Fiction Collection, because that’s the way the Horror Writers Association’s Stoker Award(R) rules work.  So big deal — if you’re an Active or a Lifetime Member of HWA, which means you can vote, please vote for it!  And it is a big deal, this being the premiere annual award for Horror, equivalent to the Nebula for science fiction or mystery’s Edgar — the Oscar, if one will, for fearsome print.  And while you’re at it, please buy a copy, spread the word, feature TOMBS on your blog (if you have a blog), and, if you think the book is at all worth while, please write a review for Amazon,Goodreads, B&N, et al.

Every bit helps in this, the cutthroat world of publishing, where books routinely disappear without leaving a ripple.  So even making it onto a preliminary ballot is super worth while!

So, here’s part of the official HWA announcement, while I will sit here being quietly proud:

The Horror Writers Association (HWA) is pleased to announce the Preliminary Ballots for the 2017 Bram Stoker Awards®. The HWA (see http://www.horror.org ) is the premier writers organization in the horror and dark fiction genre, with over 1,300 members. We have presented the Bram Stoker Awards in various categories since 1987 (see http://horror.org/bram-stoker-awards/#about ).

Works on this ballot are not referred to as “nominees” or “finalists”. Only works appearing on the Final Ballot may be referred to as “nominated works” and their authors as “finalists”.

The HWA Board and the Bram Stoker Awards® Committee congratulate all those appearing on the Preliminary Ballot. Notes about the voting process will appear after the ballot listing.

And now you’ve heard it too.

Just a very, very short entry.  Yesterday saw the arrival of a preliminary proof copy of DEADSTEAM, the steampunkish Victorian anthology of tales centered around the dead, which recently accepted my story “The Re-Possessed (see January 11).  Letting no grass grow under his feet, Editor Bryan Raffle requested corrections, if any, to edits, comments on questions (including in some cases minor rewriting), plus bios and photos, etc.  And so the beat goes on:  I, seeing only a few very minor changes plus really only one comment to address, was able to get the package together and off it went back this afternoon.  Publication to my best knowledge is still scheduled for fall (thus authors who might have been asked for rewrites should have time to complete them) with, among other things, a proposed series of author interviews to be conducted as part of a pre-release publicity campaign — and which I was delighted to agree to!  More to be here as it becomes known.

And so why not?  Do we remember the post on PHOBOS, the Deep Black Sea issue (and with my Lovecraftian story in it, “The Dark Call of the Sea”)?  Pause for a moment to scroll, below, to January 4.  And do we recall now that strange mermaid cover, reaching down to some tentacled thing beneath?  The artist for that was one Abigail Larson who, through the power today of pure serendipity, we have a chance to meet again.

Or, to quote writer Gwendolyn Nix:  Step back, Disney.  A new artist is in town, one that stays true to the dark truths of our beloved fairytales.  Inside the world of Abigail Larson, monsters lurk in the shadows and melancholy protagonists face what they fear most – their own imagination.  Crafted within a Victorian-era inspired backdrop, Larson’s imagination comes to life on the page, visually ushering in a new era of Tim Burton inspired lines and Edward Gorey aesthetic with skillful application of watercolor, ink, and Photoshop.

The article is “Darker Than Disney:  The Shadowed Imagination of Abigail Larson” and it comes to us via DEARDARKLING.COM — and the art is delicious.  A treat for a snowy, snowy Monday from where I’m writing, for more of which (including the aforementioned mermaid) press here.

And talking about a good start to the month, another acceptance came in today, also for a reprint originally published in the Spring 2006 DARK WISDOM.   Thank you for sending “The Wind” to the FORBIDDEN anthology.  As usual, you submitted a well written and captivating story.  I really enjoyed this supernatural take on the theme, and I have kept it under consideration for a long time.  Now, after such waiting, I am pleased to accept it to the collection.  I have attached the publishing agreement which you can send back when you have the chance.

FORBIDDEN, to cite the guidelines, is to be an anthology of repression, restriction, and rebellion.  Quoting Editor Martin T. Ingham, [t]hroughout recorded history, there have been rules and regulations, customs and traditions.  Some have been libertine while others oppressive; the morally strict and the sinfully decadent.  There have always been those who impose the law, and those who reject it.  Wherever there is civilization, there are things that are Forbidden!  In the case of “The Wind,” a once religious man has lost his daughter in a freak accident and, instead of accepting it as he should, he questions not law or society about it, but God.

Long-time readers may note this is not the first mention here of Martinus Publishing/Martinus Press, publishers also of the zombie anthology LIFE OF THE DEAD (with my “Girls Gone Dead”) and ALTERED AMERICA (“Avoid Seeing a Mouse”), and while paying in royalties has — especially with ALTERED AMERICA — done so fairly handsomely (cf. July 31 2016, January 20 2015, et al.).  Publication for FORBIDDEN is tentatively set for spring, most likely in May.

I want your stories that embrace the traditional horror story-telling of the Victorian penny dreadfuls and gothic mysteries.  Steampunk is certainly welcome here, but I’m more interested in Poe and Mary Shelly than Verne and Wells.  I will happily accept tales that pair the gothic with the steamy mechanical contraptions inherent to steampunk.  Give me the fog-drenched dreadpunk Victoriana.  [and]  Your tale should include at least one dead creature, be it a ghost, a vampire, a zombie, or some creature of your own invention, and should fit into some alternate version of the Victorian era.

Sounds like fun, yes?  Such was the call last fall from Bryce Raffle for the upcoming DEADSTEAM, an anthology that aims to showcase the dark side of steampunk, the ghoulish and the gothic, tales of gaslamp and dreadpunk that embrace the macabre.  And who was I to resist it? So, the money not much but reprints allowed, off went a story published originally in CEMETERY RIOTS (Elysium Press, 2016), “The Re-Possessed.”  And Thursday the word came back:  Thank you for allowing me to read your story. I thoroughly enjoyed it, and think it will be a great fit for the DeadSteam anthology. Honestly, I got chills reading it!

Also attached was a contract with other information concerning proof copies, payment, and publicity, etc., the former to be sent back Friday. According to the guidelines last fall, the hope is to release the anthology Halloween this year, and, at least from the descriptions above, it sounds like a neat one!  More will be here as details become known.

No, the pictured DEATH: A GRAVESIDE COMPANION is not part of the list but, courtesy of ELECTRICLITERATURE.COM, herewith by its editor Joanna Ebenstein “10 Death-Obsessed Books to Satisfy Your Inner Goth.”  And, did I say eclectic?  How about leading it off with E. B. White’s beloved children’s tale of CHARLOTTE’S WEB in which Wilbur the pig learns that his purpose in life is to be made into bacon — and then adding, at number 6, Oscar Wilde’s SALOMÉ: A TRAGEDY IN ONE ACT, with illustrations by Aubrey Beardsley?  Other entrants include Edward Gorey’s THE GASHLYCRUMB TINIES (number 5), Henry James with THE TURN OF THE SCREW (number 7) George DuMaurier’s TRILBY (number 4), even Anne Rice’s INTERVIEW WITH THE VAMPIRE (number 9).  So some may be familiar, some maybe not so much, but all can be found by pressing here.

With a Sunday respite from cold, cold weather last week, the Bloomington Writers Guild’s “First Sunday Prose Reading & Open Mic” (see December 4, et al.) had its 2018 start in a new and most likely temporary venue, the Monroe County Library Auditorium, due to the imminent closing of Boxcar Books.  The featured readers were speculative fiction writer and sometimes poet Darja Malcolm-Clarke with an excerpt from a story to bloomingtonwritersguildappear in SEE THE ELEPHANT magazine, “Wren’s Flight”; YA novelist Julia Karr with three short pieces based on prompts from a writing course several years back; and School of Education doctoral candidate Adam Henze with a group of fictionalized essays on various aspects of the teaching experience, including one in haibun form.  Snacks (to be eaten in the library’s atrium only) followed, leading into the open mike session with five readings, of which mine was third, “Midnight Sun,” a Christmas tale of zombies and vampirism in its own cold, cold weather setting, thus giving it a special relevance to the well below freezing previous few days.

It was a long time coming, originally set for March or April last year, then “officially” published around July, but PHOBOS 4 has at last arrived (cf. July 11, February 24, et al.) — and is listed now on Amazon as well!  PHOBOS publishes themed magazines and the subject for this one is “Deep Black Sea” with my story in it, a Lovecraftian romp titled “The Dark Call of the Sea” about a musician and his artist sister and how a beach vacation at Innsmouth may not have been wise, the last in the contents.  Other stories concern such items as killer mermaids in the koi pond, cyborgs in lifeboats, and impolite pirates, and all in all PHOBOS 4 seems a pretty good read so far.  For more, one can press here.

In other news, 2018’s first royalty check came in the mail Wednesday and, not for the first time, the real winner was the U.S. Post Office which sold the stamp.  As is my custom, neither publisher nor book will be mentioned to avoid embarrassment on both sides, but suffice to say when it’s for one story in an anthology amounts are likely to be small anyway.  Nevertheless, money is money and, no matter how little, the fact that there’s any is an endorsement.

So it’s still the Christmas Season, isn’t it (cf. number 10, “12 Days of Christmas: A Tale of Avian Misery,” and one of my favorites)?  So herewith, to while the minutes of an otherwise very cold late New Years Day, at least where I live and not a time to be going outside, welcome “13 Short Horror Films to Exorcise Holiday Mirth and Cheer” by Marni Molina, courtesy of DEARDARKLING.COM.  Viewing times range from 1:49 to 16:01 minutes.

To sample, press here — but think twice before sharing these with the kiddies (this means you too, Triana)!




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