Posts Tagged ‘Daily Science Fiction’

Told you so (cf. May 7; also April 28, 21 2015, et al.), and now it’s up.  A tale of les filles à les caissettes of New Orleans, in particular of the one named “Lo,” being interviewed by a reporter from the Times-Picayune.  But let’s let Short Mystery Fiction moderator Kevin R. Tipple make the formal announcement.

Today, James Dorr shares his “paranormal detective story” archived at DAILY SCIENCE FICTION titled “Dead Lines.”  James adds that the tale is also “. . . intended as a tip of the hat to Edgar Allan Poe as a father of the detective genre.”  While at the site, James has another story, “Casket Girls” in the archives for your reading pleasure.

So what’s the occasion?  May happens to be International Short Story Month and in celebration, the SMFS has been posting a story a day from society members throughout the month.  To see for yourself, one need but press here.  This takes you to the Society’s blog from which there’s not only the story du jour, but scrolling down (e.g, .mine will be one story below if you happen on this tomorrow, Friday May 12) you can read the stories of previous days all the way to May 1.  So how’s that for a deal?

And one thing more, as Kevin points out, an additional link to “Casket Girls” invites you to go to the background tale of les filles’ arrival at the Big Easy in 1728, and the one named Aimée.  And as a further bonus, when on the DAILY SF site if you type my last name in the search box on the right, you can find three additional  stories by me, though not in the New Orleanian series.

May is International Short Story Month and, in celebration, the Short Mystery Fiction Society has put out the call for a story a day, if they can get ’em, from writer-members.  These would be already published stories, to be sure, with the idea that links will be provided on the SMFS blog daily, and word came this morning:  I’m up for Thursday.  That is, this Thursday, May 11, with the story in question one actually published on DAILY SCIENCE FICTION, but nevertheless a mystery of sorts, a tale of les filles à les caissettes of New Orleanian fame and the one called Lo, titled “Dead Lines” (see April 28, 21 2015, et al.).  Moreover, according to coordinator Kevin R. Tipple, “I took the liberty of adding your explanation of the tale to the blog posting so that folks who are clueless don’t send me emails asking what is up 🙂 ,” this regarding the story’s also referencing, in an oblique way, Edgar Allan Poe as a founder of the detective story — and also, if he includes it, a second link to the original story “Casket Girls.”

So you get two for one on Thursday (or even more — since the story will be in DAILY SF’s archives, type “Dorr” in the search box it will provide to find three additional short shorts by me).  Or, if in a hurry to see what’s what on the mystery side, the SMFS blog with today’s story can be reached by pressing here.

In other news, a lovely sunny Sunday afternoon marked this month’s “First Sunday Prose Reading & Open Mic,” co-sponsored by the Bloomington Writers Guild and local bookstore Boxcar Books, with  featured readers Amy L. Cornell (who we’ve met before, cf. May 1 2016) with a poem, a short story, and a sort of essay coming back to poetry; Abegunde (cf. March 27, 6 2016, et al.) with a selection of essays on “what lies beneath” her recent poetry MS about  a visit to Juba, South Sudan (a portion of which was also a finalist for the 2017 COG Poetry Award); and Khashayar Tonekaboni (pen name Terry Pinaud, cf. February 7 2016) with a short story based, in part, on a French Canadian play.  Then after the break, there were five open mike readers with me number three, with a story of sweet lesbian, non-casket girl, vampire love titled “A Cup Full of Tears,” originally published in MON COEUR MORT (Post Mortem Press, 2011).

This also marks the last “First Sunday” gathering for this spring, with the series to resume again in early autumn.

Saturday, along with the excitement of having sold “Bottles” (see post just below), brought the Bloomington Writers Guild’s end-of-year combination business meeting, voting for officers, pot luck party, and open reading, for which I ran for nothing but brought orange slices for a healthy pot luck dessert.  Just like “party calories” though, which do not count, so, too, healthful party food adds no nutrition, so I with everyone else went for the chocolate chip cookies.  More to the literary point, however, I had brought two items for possible reading: one a Christmas story excerpt which would run about five minutes; the other three poems (one of which some people would have heard before but others wouldn’t) which could be read in less than three minutes.

The business/election part ran a bit long so I ended up taking the three-minute option, but adding that the other, a Christmas story involving a vampire and St. Nicholas, would be read “tomorrow” as a First Sunday open mike option.  And so for Saturday afternoon I carroll-borland-as-spidra-in-mark-of-the-vampire-1365795084_orgread the three poems, “as a sort of introduction, to show the up side of vampirism” and all from my poetry collection VAMPS (A RETROSPECTIVE), the jazzy “Hi-Flying,” the unlife-celebratory “Night Child,” and the exhilarating “The Aeronaut.”

Then Sunday brought December’s First Sunday Prose Reading with featured participants Shayne Laughter with “Emmonsburg,” from a collection of stories inspired by her grandfather’s writings about growing up in Indiana; speculative fiction and poetry writer Darja Malcolm-Clarke with an excerpt from a novel in progress, HIS ONE TRUE BRIDE; and Poet Eric Rensberger with “a prose thing” composed by taking an existing text, chopping it up, and reassembling it into a new story, in this case from memoirs by an early American actor, John Durang.  These were followed by the open mike session where, as promised, my reading was of the latter, and larger half of “Naughty or Nice?” as published on December 21 2011 in DAILY SCIENCE FICTION, concerning the vampiress Mignonette and whether she could prove to the Saint that she was sufficiently “nice” to get presents.  And which, by the way, you can find out for yourself by clicking here.

And then two more items to complete the weekend.  Friday I went to the opening night of a workshop production of Jean Anouilh’s version of ANTIGONE, in this case combining dance with the action and very well done.  Then Saturday evening, after the party, brought a visit to the local Bloomington Krampusnacht celebration, considered one of the best these days in the United States.  For various reasons this was the first I was able to get to since the initial one three years ago, for which see below, December 9 2012.

Sometimes you’ve got it, sometimes you don’t.  Sometimes you submit a story to an anthology that may be peripheral to its theme depending on how the editor sees it, sometimes it’s more like a solid hit right down the center of the park — or at least that’s how you see it.  In this case the money might not be great, though they encouraged reprints.  And the title, well, how could one resist?  CORPUS DELUXE: UNDEAD TALES OF TERROR.

“We want your horror stories featuring the undead — zombies, revenants, mummies, ghouls, ghasts, you name it, even vampires although bloodsuckers may be a hard sale since we envision ourselves being deluged with vampire stories.  Be original!”  The length range was 2000 to 5000 words (this let out some vampire stories I might have tried, published in places like DAILY SCIENCE FICTION, since they’d be too short).  So zombies could be nice, but aren’t they getting a bit common too?

But above all the idea is still:  be original.  What I do sometimes is list out stories when reprints are allowed, then cross out the ones that seem least likely, taking in word lengths, sub-themes, etc., circling the ones that seem most attuned to what seems to be wanted.  So what ended up on top was a “Tombs” story, one in an exotic dying-world setting a3766224nd with a zombie in it, yes, but with a science-fictional sort of pseudo explanation, and as a bonus one that appears in THE TEARS OF ISIS (albeit originally published in Canada in Ink Oink Art, Inc.’s 2008 anthology ESCAPE CLAUSE) thus making it a sort of advertisement as well for the collection.  And also a story I often use for readings, etc., with (may I say it?) a truly horrific ending.*  The story, if not last (cf. post for September 19, below) then next to last in THE TEARS OF ISIS, “River Red.”

Off it went Monday, September 21, and the question became “did I choose well?”  The answer arrived today, only three days later, from Editor Jorge Salgado-Reyes:  “Thank you for your submission.  We have accepted it.”  In other words, a resounding yes.

(And one sort of P.S. that can bear repeating:  “Please announce it from the four corners of the interwebs.  We need as much social media buzz as possible in the lead up to publication.”)

 

*The ending, actually, is cribbed from Euripides so I probably can say it.

Today’s e-announcement of T. GENE DAVIS’S SPECULATIVE BLOG brought, along with a new story, several reruns as is its custom, including one by me.  “Flightless Rats” is one of several stories based on the New Orleanian urban legend of the “Casket Girls,” of which two, the eponymous “Casket Girls” and “Dead Lines,” have been published on DAILY SCIENCE FICVampiresMusidora6TION on April 10 2014 and April 21 this year, respectively.  “Flightless Rats” itself appeared only eight months ago (see January 12, et al.), so it’s not all that old, but in the meantime the link has changed as the SPECULATIVE BLOG transitions to a new name of FREESCIENCEFICTION.COM, so for those who may have missed it before, the all-new place to find “Flightless Rats” is here.

One might mention also that, like DAILY SCIENCE FICTION, one can subscribe for free for announcements and links when each new story is posted, for which press the same link for “Flightless Rats,” then scroll  down past the story and “Comments” section and fill in the blanks where it says “Subscribe Me.”  For DAILY SCIENCE FICTION, incidentally, one can press here (and then for my stories, including “Dead Lines” and “Casket Girls,” enter my last name only, Dorr, in the search box to the right).

What about those casket girls anyway?  Les filles à les caissettes (see April 17, 10 2014, et al.) are at it again with  Aimée’s amie “Lo” starring in her own story, the Poesque “Dead Lines.”  Mystery along the Mississippi!  For more, if a subscriber check DAILY SCIENCE FICTION by clicking here; if not, you can subscribe for free at the same site or just wait a week and find it by searching for “Dorr” in the archives.

In other news, “Black Chaos comes again in 25 MORE frightful — and frightfully funny — tales of the zombie, from the wilds of 19th century Canada to the farthest edge of the galaxy, and from college dorms to Wal-Mart.  You may think you know zombies, but not these!”  So begins the blurb for BLACK CHAOS II, with my story “Cold, Lifeless Fingers” (cf.  March 10, et al.), now available for pre-order in ebook form from Smashwords and Amazon.  And, as with the ebook, the print edition should be out soon from publisher Big Pulp or “through any bookstore.”  More will follow as it becomes known.

The room is darkened and, behind you, a fluttering sound — the end of the reel being played on an old-style movie projector, or . . . ?  Well, lest we forget, Friday the 17th of April is Bat Appreciation Day.  For more on our featherless flyibatzng friends, including Fun Bat Facts, one can press here.  And scroll down to the comments section for a bonus SMILEYBAT.COM link plus an “origins” explanation of why this date was chosen.

Or . . . maybe it was the projector or at least cinema related, as Black Wyrm Publishing’s REEL DARK anthology (“Twisted Fantasies Projected on the Flickering Page” — see also March 24, 13) continues toward its projected (ahem) publication date for World Horror Convention, May 7-10.  So this is another step in the creation of an anthology, gathering data about the authors, which came about yesterday with a request for a bio, a photo, and e-addresses for the blog, Facebook, etc., to be included, all of which were sent back last night.

Then finally last night I received a proof sheet for my story “Dead Lines” from DAILY SCIENCE FICTION, a final step in the publishing process.  The story is scheduled for four days from now, Tuesday April 21 (cf. March 31, et al.), so the proof, with any corrections, will go back this evening.  And, in the meantime, for those who don’t subscribe to DAILY SF (you’ll still be able to read “Dead Lines,” a tale of New Orleans and mystery along the Mississippi, plus other stories I have in the site’s archives except it won’t go in until a week later — just enter “Dorr” [the last name only for this one] in the search box to the right) you could do so now for free on their website, found here.

A week and a half short of one year ago, on April 10 2014, my New Orleans-based vampire tale “Casket Girls” went out to subscribers of DAILY SCIENCE FICTION.  One week later on the 17th it went into the archives where it can be seen by subscribers and non-subscribers alike.   Then today I received via SFSIGNAL.COM a preview copy of April’s DAILY SF story roster (probably available on DSF’s own Facebook page by tomorrow morlogo-e-mailning since then of course it’ll be April, but for the scoop, for what it’s worth) announcing that in just about three weeks, April 21, a year and eleven days after Aimeé the vampiress made her debut, my next story “Dead Lines” (see January 1; December 23 2014) is set to appear.

“Dead Lines” is a Poesque mystery of sorts, of the disappearance of one Mr. Valdemar and the gracious New Orleanian grande dame “Lo” who may know more about it, as well as the original casket girls, than she lets on.  It will be my fifth story for DAILY SF.

Then a second quick note, while it’s unofficial I understand that following some last minute edits the paperback version of White Cat’s AIRSHIPS & AUTOMATONS (see March 19, et al.) has gone to the printer, to become available hopefully in two weeks or less.

“Art: that which is raised to more than ordinary importance; that which, even if temporary, is forever after etched in the collective being of man.” ~James S. Dorr

The next story is “THE ARTIST ” by James S. Dorr.  This brilliantly written tale is about a man who loves his art and his wife, but his wife, unable to comprehend the beauty of art starts to drift away and into another man’s arms. . . .  (SPLATTER CAFÉ)

Editor (with Sharon Lawson) Anthony Rivera has posted a second review of the 2013 anthology SPLATTERLANDS (cf. January 28, et al.) in the last five days, noting of this one from SPLATTER CAFÉ, “[w]e freely admit that the work in SPLATTERLANDS is not for everyone, but it is for those who appreciate their horror extreme yet still intelligent and with (*gasp*) a PLOT!  (And if that type of horror isn’t for you, we have plenty more volumes that are.) Apparently, this is exactly the type of horror that Splatter Cafe is looking for.  😉

“Splatter Cafe:  ‘[Splatterpunk], the beast of revolutionary horror, has definitely been reawakened and it’s ready to ravage your psyche long after the last words have been consumed.  [The] Bram Stoker Award-nominated editors at Grey Matter Press have created something special with this 52581dff3b861f4b7da08878773490b3anthology.  SPLATTERLANDS: REAWAKENING THE SPLATTERPUNK REVOLUTION is 13 deliciously horrific stories of serial murder, vengeance, religious fanaticism, sexual assault and so much more.  SPLATTERLANDS will tear into your flesh, shredding chunks of your own morality, leaving you bloodied, violated and dismembered.’

“Splatter Cafe pays special tribute to illustrator Luke Spooner of Carrion House and authors Jack Maddox, Christine Morgan, Ray Garton, James Dorr, and J Michael Major. . . .”

And so, for a Super Sunday brag (to be read as one will) I’ve already quoted above part of what SPLATTER CAFÉ reviewer L. D. Johnson says about . . . moi.  And there is a bit more, as well as a lot of perceptive words about SPLATTERLANDS and publisher Grey Matter Press in general, which all can be found here.

I read this review at the public library less than an hour before 2015’s second Bloomington Writers Guild sponsored First Sunday Prose Reading at Boxcar Books, just a block east.  The featured readers for February were Stephanie Haines who read humorous essays from a newspaper column she writes on topics such as dating at 40, ice cream, cheapskates, and Jane Austen, followed by Communications and Culture PhD student Eric Zobel who, with the assistance of three other readers, presented “Adventures in Indifference,” described as “a prose piece for multiple voices.”

This was also the second in which a few open mike readers were allowed more time than the “standard” three to five minutes (cf. last month, January 5).  I took advantage by reading a personal favorite of mine, “Casket Girls,” originally published in DAILY SCIENCE FICTION last April.  If interested, those who haven’t read it (or wish a refresher) can go to the DAILY SF site and enter “Dorr” in the search box on the right for it and, at present, three more stories (with a fifth, “Dead Lines,” to come, probably this spring) that I’ve had there.

Speaking of vampires, today’s the day my short-short, “Flightless Rats” (see November 30, 26), has gone up on T. GENE DAVIS’S SPECULATIVE BLOG.  “Flightless Rats” tells of a brief encounter with the vampiress Aimée (who wCirqueduNuitBall-2013e may recall from “Casket Girls,” cf. April 17, et al.) about a century after her original 1728 arrival in New Orleans, who, finding herself temporarily between husbands, has decided to experiment with dating.

T. GENE DAVIS’S SPECULATIVE BLOG, to quote from its blurb, “releases a family-friendly speculative story every Monday, mostly by guest authors.”  Rather like DAILY SCIENCE FICTION, publisher of the original “Casket Girls,” it can be subscribed to for free and offers generally high quality fiction, also usually rather short.  It can be reached by pressing here to read “Flightless Rats,” as well as for information on signing up for those who wish to.

And yes, Aimée does walk home alone, at least on this night.




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