Posts Tagged ‘Myths’

Two items today, the first that the current issue of STAR*LINE arrived Friday afternoon with a three-line mermaid-vampiress poem, “Wet Work,” by me on page 12.  Hidden, where one would not expect her, look for her down in the depths on the right.  STAR*LINE is the publication of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Poetry Association (SFPA) which also runs an annual Rhysling competition for speculative poetry.  More information on that and STAR*LINE can be found on their website by pressing here.

Then ASTOUNDING OUTPOST (for more on which see just below, December 1) announces that a Kindle edition of NEURAL NETS, UPLINKS, AND WETWARE is now up and on sale for 99 cents for a limited time.  They don’t say for how long the sale will last, so to take advantage one should press here now.  Also don’t forget you can vote for my story, “No Place to Hide,” by using the link in the post below and, as a bonus, as it’s third in the contents in the Kindle edition one can read it in its entirety in the sample pages at the Amazon site (much more readable there than in the original web publication, which one can also find linked to at the end of the post just below).

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Today brings an email plus PDF proof from Editor Vince Gotera of the latest STAR*LINE for Fall 2017.  Please proof your piece(s) . . . as well as your listing(s) in the table of contents.  Could you please get back to me with any corrections ASAP?  In my case the page of interest is the twelfth with, sharing poems by Christine Sng and by R. Mac Jones, tucked neatly in at the bottom right my three-liner “Wet Work” (cf. October 13).  And this time, aha!, there was an error, one of the sort that would sneak past a computer spell-checker (whereas, ironically, the correct word might not).

So not to worry, I’ve sent back the change along with mailing and payment details.  More to come when the published issue arrives.

Let us take a quick trip down memory lane to April 25 and my coverage of the Polish mermaid film THE LURE, a Goth-rock variant of Hans Christian Andersen’s “The Little Mermaid.”  Then, back to today, what should I run across courtesy of DIRGEMAG.COM but “Dark Mermaids Take Everything Men Fear and Use It Against Them” by Brenda S G Walter, including her take on “The Little Mermaid” as well as THE LURE and two other films.  In this case the “lure” (sorry) is primarily via the Andersen tale — no dwelling on mermaids’ alter lives in the siren trade, for instance, but then the payoff is still the same.  These are hungry fish-ladies.  And, music or not, the piece is interesting (and a little Freudian) and can be read by pressing here.

Then, for the writing life, Saturday after my writers critique group eviscerated my TOMBS:  A CHRONICLE OF LATTER-DAY TIMES OF EARTH essays (cf. May 18 just below, et al., and no, they didn’t really — I did post all three essays to the group in lieu of a story this month, for which comments, while mixed as to which one might be a given critiquer’s favorite, were generally encouraging), I continued to local restaurant-bar The Crazy Horse for a celebration and signing for Bloomington Writers Guild member and poet Nancy Chen Long’s just published book, LIGHT INTO BODIES.  To lazily quote from the invitation:  This event is a thanks-giving.  As a way of honoring, Nancy has invited Cynthia Bretheim and Beth Lodge-Rigal, two women that she credits for getting her back into poetry back in 2006, to read.  Members of Five Women Poets, a local writing group that Nancy belongs to, will also read.  In addition, two friends whose artistic-ness inspire her — Matt Allen on jazz guitar and Stephen Simms on bass — have been invited to share their music.  It also was fun, and with good snacks too, and a special feeling of kinship for me on the eve, as it were, of my own book’s release which, if not an absolute first as such, is my first novel.
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More on Nancy’s book, officially published on May 10, can be found by pressing here; more on my TOMBS:  A CHRONICLE OF LATTER-DAY TIMES OF EARTH by pressing its picture in the center column.

Kindle readers alert:  For a start on the upcoming Halloween season, Perpetual Motion Machine Publishing has gone one up on its Labor Day sale (see September 1) with a month-long special discount on the Stoker Award® nominated dark fantasy/horror collection THE TEARS OF ISIS.   In effect from now through September 30, according to publisher Max Booth III, the electronic edition can be obtained for just 99 cents.

To quote from the blurb on the PMMP site:  . . . the book we have here, THE TEARS OF ISIS, begins with a poem about a sculptor, a modern Medusa, and concludes with the title story of another sculptor who travels a continent for inspiration, in search of the IsisNewgoddess, “the Weeping Isis,” and ends with discovery of her own self.  But THE TEARS OF ISIS, the book, is a journey too, encompassing, yes, “forms such as never were in nature,” as not just “La Méduse,” but also a man’s soul absorbed by an octopus, vampires both physical and metaphorical, music and retellings of Cinderella, an Ancient World caper involving the Golden Fleece of legend, a far-future recasting of Sleeping Beauty — one of three stories in THE TEARS OF ISIS set in the author’s world of the “Tombs,” another “Tombs” tale of the origin of ghouls, cockroaches spawned by war, insects by UFOs, Lovecraftian monsters called forth by candles, a woman who takes in a rat as a pet, the “death planet” Saturn and women who buy birds, the life-cycle of dragons, another “Tombs” story of love and a zombie-like form of revenge, and at last to Isis — her search to create but destroying as well, as is part of her nature, and back full circle to sculptress Medusa who “spoke to her hair at times” and “in her dreams . . . her hair hissed its/ answers.”

The sale is just for the electronic edition, normally priced at $2.99, but there is a print edition as well for only $12.38 on Amazon, reachable from the Kindle site for those who prefer the feel of paper.  For further information including readers’ reviews, or to order, press here.

And as for the portion I wrote in this one (excepting the introduction), all of it.

In fact, I wish this had been out before the voting, not that one review, even on Amazon, likely would have made that much difference, but this one’s a keeper.  It appeared Sunday — just in time for me not to see it until latish Tuesday, since much of Monday was taken up by the trip home from Portland — but, in itself, it is worth the waiting.

By William Cook, the review is titled “Beautiful depiction of the dark and tragic soul of humanity” and even covers the dedication (“The homage to Edgar Allan Poe that precedes the first piece should give you a fair indication that there will be darkness, requiring no less than a blood-red candle to light the way”) along with discussions of the golden-isisfirst and last stories, the opening poem, and bits and pieces on two or three of the other tales.  The thing that especially pleases me too, though, is Cook’s close attention to the literary aspects of THE TEARS OF ISIS:  language, allusions, imagery, myth – as well as modernism and contemporary references.  Parable and psychological horror.  And if I may say it myself, I think a number of Cook’s observations are quite astute.

In full disclosure, it should be added that Cook is a book cover artist which he mentions too, including for the present edition, to which he adds “[t]hat is not to say I feel compelled to review those works but in this case I had to write this review upon reading Mr Dorr’s book as it left such an impression on me.”

To read William Cook’s review of THE TEARS OF ISIS, along with eleven other reviews (so far, and nine of which are nice ones 😉 ), along with [ahem] a chance to buy . . . press here.

 




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