Posts Tagged ‘Tombs: A Chronicle of Latter-Day Times of Earth’

Exciting times!  A story of mine is running neck and neck in Carrie Ann Golden’s latest A WRITER AND HER SENTIMENTAL MUSE competition, this one for a tale of 100 words or less as prompted by the picture just below.  And as of last notice there were two entries in the running, each with exactly fifty percent of the total vote.  Or most likely, each has just one vote.

Should you wish to tilt the odds, you can find stories “A” and “B” in their entireties, the picture again, and a link for voting in the poll here.  And as a bonus, scroll toward the bottom and there’s a link to an interview Carrie Ann did of me on her blog back in 2016.  See early comments on my as yet to be published novel-in-stories TOMBS, as well as some dish on THE TEARS OF ISIS and on New Orleans’s filles à les caissettes.  What better to read on a warm, sunny Wednesday?

And, as for which of the stories is mine, well, you know me.  It’s likely to be the more “horrible” of them.

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Well, “mid-year” more accurately, and it’s not something to get rich on, but it could buy lunch.  Actually it’s good to see that copies are moving at all, as is the case with all royalty payments, but with a single-author novel-in-stories like TOMBS: A CHRONICLE OF LATTER-DAY TIMES OF EARTH (that is, all by me) it’s especially nice since even modest amounts add up.  I might add to that, if any here would care to contribute to the mid-winter royalty check to come, Amazon still has some bargain discounts the last I looked (two, at least, under $10.00) which can be checked out by clicking the cover picture of TOMBS in the center column.  Also, if you’re seeing this and you have read TOMBS and you think it worth while, might I suggest you might write a review and send it to Amazon, Goodreads, et al.?  Reviews need not be long or detailed, just a sentence or two perhaps mentioning what stands out about it for you, but for all authors honest reviews can be a huge help.

Just saying.

No, this isn’t the one I mentioned June 16 as having received the questions for (though I’ve since sent the answers back); nor is it the one previewed on June 3, published in England on the 6th.  No, this is the interview mentioned May 8 for Grim and Grimmer Books’s DEADSTEAM anthology, conducted by Editor-Publisher Bryce Raffle, on such subjects as dreadpunk, historic fiction, Victorian funeral directors, and . . . well, you know.  If I’ve done it right, there’ll be mentions as well of THE TEARS OF ISIS and TOMBS: A CHRONICLE OF LATTER-DAY TIMES OF EARTH, the books I’m flogging for myself.  But the major point of this one is DEADSTEAM, the anthology due out later this fall in which my entry is “The Re-Possessed,” a saga of the funeral profession in 19th Century England (originally published in CEMETERY RIOTS by Elysium Press in 2016) and inspired by thoughts during a real-life memorial service.

This will be the fourth interview Editor Raffle has done of DEADSTEAM authors, previous ones having appeared on June 8, May 11, and February 25, and can be read by pressing here.  Or if you would like to read some of the others (presumably after mine, of course) the blog main page can be reached here.  Or, for mini-biographies of all DEADSTEAM authors, one can indulge by pressing here.

And here it is, as promised (June 3), UK writer and blogger Jacky Dahlhaus’s Wednesday MEET THE AUTHOR with the interviewee for the start of June, me.  Find out the answers:  What do I like to do in my free time (excepting reading)?  Favorite authors, and how they’ve influenced me?  Pen or typewriter or computer?  My favorite genre (well, you probably know that) but also why?  Pseudonyms, writing styles, the moral of TOMBS?  And more on both TOMBS:  A CHRONICLE OF LATTER-DAY TIMES OF EARTH and THE TEARS OF ISIS — for these and more, along with a “thank you” to Jacky from me, press here!

Comes June and with it a bright sunny afternoon, breezy and in the lower 80s and, with that, the start of the Summer Reading Season.  What better way to celebrate, then, than with a new interview of . . . me, this one by UK author and blogger Jacky Dahlhaus, tentatively to go live Wednesday morning?  So three days from now be prepared for more dish on TOMBS:  A CHRONICLE OF LATTER-DAY TIMES OF EARTH, a mention or two (it mustn’t feel left out!) of THE TEARS OF ISIS, the importance of (*ahem*) reviews to all authors, plus details on the inspiration and influence of Poe and Bradbury (with mentions here of Ginsberg and Brecht), whether I start writing with a pen or on the computer . . . well, you may have seen interviews by me before, but maybe this one will have new stuff to say too.  You can’t really tell until you read it, coming up Wednesday.

And a quick second note, Ms. Dahlhaus is looking for a few more interviewees for the summer, if any other writers out there might be interested in some free publicity.  But there are a few qualifications in terms of work already published, more on which can be found at her website by pressing here.

Or, in the words of Jamie Bogert in “The Disturbing Origins of 9 Beloved Fairy Tales,” on THE-LINE-UP.COM:  Bedtime is often sweetened by stories of handsome princes and beautiful princesses, comical witches and lovable forest dwellers.  But what happens when we follow the breadcrumb trail to a fairy tale’s gloomy origin?  From the Little Mermaid to Little Red Riding Hood, the sugarcoated renditions we know and love come from much darker places.  If a Disney-themed wedding is in your future, beware:  The disturbing origins of these classic stories are anything but sweet.

And so it goes, in some cases only that the Disney versions we may know and love often leave out the, um, interesting parts; in others perhaps that dark actual events may underlie what we read as children. In addation to the two already noted, the fairy tales discussed are Hansel and Gretel, Sleeping Beauty, The Pied Piper of Hamelin, The Frog Prince, Cinderella, Beauty and the Beast, and Snow White, and the neat thing is that I’ve written my own versions of, or inspired by, every one of these (disclaimer: that doesn’t necessarily mean every one of these has sold), though Cinderella and Snow White are probably my favorites.  E.g., did you notice Sleeping Beauty in TOMBS?  But in any event, for a quick update on the lore of our youth, one need but press here.

This is another announcement I’ve missed by a few days (so it goes, cf. March 26) but DIGITAL HORROR FICTION ANTHOLOGY is now available on Amazon in print as well as Kindle.  Also the Kindle sale is over, with the price there gone up to $4.99, while the paperback price is $12.99.  My story in this, as noted before, is “The Borrowed Man,” a TOMBS world story but one that does not appear in the novel TOMBS: A CHRONICLE OF LATTER-DAY TIMES OF EARTH itself.  Originally published in THE GIRL AT THE END OF THE WORLD, BOOK 1 (Fox Spirit Books, 2014), “The Borrowed Man” tells of a women who hires the help of a corpse-train master to build a man out of selected parts — legs for dancing, lips for kissing, etc. — from the recently dead in order to construct a perfect lover.  But a question remains:   What of this man’s soul?

If interested, for more on the print edition press here, while a link to the Kindle version can be found in the post for March 26, below.

This is sort of a stealth announcement, the publication of one of my stories that I only found out about today, obliquely, via another author’s tag on Facebook.  So it goes.  The anthology is DIGITAL HORROR FICTION ANTHOLOGY:  VOLUME 1, by Digital Fiction Publishing Corp., and the story, sixth on the contents list, “The Borrowed Man” originally published by Fox Spirit Books in 2014 in THE GIRL AT THE END OF THE WORLD, BOOK 1 (cf. August 30 2017; August 8 2014, et al.).  “The Borrowed Man,” incidentally, is set in the world of TOMBS:  A CHRONICLE OF LATTER-DAY TIMES OF EARTH although not a part of the novel-in-stories itself, and concerns a wealthy New City woman who wishes to possess a perfect man.

In all, DIGITAL FICTION HORROR ANTHOLOGY contains 25 stories, and looks at least to cover a variety of types and topics.  For more one may peruse the table of contents, below, or check it out on Amazon here where, at least for the moment, the Kindle edition can be obtained for just 99 cents!

2:51, Behind the Caterpillar — Gregory L. Norris
A Dream for Sugar — Bruce Memblatt
A Pocket of Madness — Samuel Marzioli
Aces and Kings — David M. Hoenig
The Animals — Aaron Gudmunson
The Borrowed Man — James Dorr
His Own Personal Golgotha — Geoff Brown
Building Condemned (Seeking Asylum) — Adrian Ludens
Compartmental — Jay Caselberg
Democracy — Larry Hinkle
Demon Driver — Adrian Cole
Late for Eisheth — Tracie McBride
Giving at the Office — Geoff Gander
Shadows of the Darkest Jade — Sarah Hans
Intermediary — Jason A. Wyckoff
Ark of the Lonesome — Jenner Michaud
SdroW — Bruce Lockhart 2nd & Suzie Lockhart
Roadkill — C.M. Saunders
Sapphire Eyes Shining — Rie Sheridan Rose
Suggestive Thoughts — H.L. Fullerton
Symeon — Bill Zaget
The Good Life — Michelle Mellon
The Great White Bed — Don Webb
The River Slurry — Rue Karney
Where There Is Life — Renee Miller

I might mention, also, that I have a story due to come out in DIGITAL SCIENCE FICTION, a companion volume of sorts, or maybe even out by now.  More tags via Facebook, perhaps, will tell.

So, as we know (cf. March 4, below) I made it home from Providence Sunday, though fate (and American Airlines) apparently would have preferred that it be Monday.  A flight to Philadelphia cancelled (one does not get to Indianapolis without changing planes at some point in the journey)!  But I persisted as the saying goes, and a way was found, via Washington DC, with only one small glitch — it left from Boston.  Ha ha!

But I once lived in the Boston area a long time ago and Logan Airport is no farther from Providence than, say, Indianapolis from where I live now.  There are trains and busses, though schedules might be chancy on Sunday.  So going back to the Dean Hotel (a lucky connection with a Providence city bus from the airport there back into the city) where I had been staying, and technically wouldn’t have had to check out till 11 a.m., where they let me borrow my room key back to rest for an hour or two, then set up a ride for me via Uber for, still, significantly less than the cost of an extra night in a hotel.

So I got back to Bloomington three hours later than I had planned — big deal, big deal!  I who on Friday had survived, and walked between hotels, and 7-11s and CVSs to cobble together a rustic lunch, what USA TODAY has described as a “bomb cyclone”!

So, weather disasters and airports aside, just what was I doing at StokerCon?

Not schmoozing in the ConSuite for one thing.  They didn’t have one — which is rather amateur in my opinion, the hospitality suite even more than proverbial, though over-noisy hotel bars being where people get together during lulls between panels and other activities.  On Friday night, however, after 4 p.m.’s Dark Poets Face to Face Redux, several of the poets and I kind of faked it with order-in pizza (the “bomb cyclone” beginning to wind down) in one of our number’s room.  And at 8 p.m. repaired from there to the Third Annual Final Frame Horror Short Film Competition, won by the very funny — and horrid — Great Choice (dir. Robin Comisar, “A woman gets stuck in a Red Lobster commercial”), with 2nd place going to Exhale (a.k.a. Expire, dir. Magali Magistry, “A toxic fog, the Smog, blanketed the planet forcing people to live confined.  But when you are 15 like Juliette, real life truly begins outside) and 3rd to Winston (animated, dir. Aram Sarkisian, “A man is driven mad by his obsession and paranoia), some of which once the film festival season has ended may begin to be seeable on YouTube.

Other things I wasn’t on, but attended on Friday, were panels:  Pulp Horror 2018, How (Not) to Win the Bram Stoker® Award, a post-lunch final half hour of What’s Vlad Got to Do with It? (“a tour thru Romania with Dacre Stoker”), How to Make Ordinary Things Scary (having noted to Dark Poets moderator Marge Simon that my TOMBS: A CHRONICLE OF LATTER-DAY TIMES OF EARTH, on the other hand, seeks in a way to make scary things ordinary), and DARK CARNIVAL: The Writing Prompts of Ray Bradbury.  A very full day!

Saturday, following coffee Americano and a huge pecan donut at the Dean Hotel’s coffeehouse (very good, but nevertheless apart from the convention, still not a ConSuite) I shared a prose reading (Block Thirteen, 10 a.m. in the official program) with participant and host for the previous evening’s poetry and pizza Karen Bovenmyer, and Nathan Carson, with me reading the Part III chapter called “Carnival of the Animals” from TOMBS.  Afterward it was back to my hotel and one block farther to Providence’s public library, to use a computer to reconnect, briefly, with the outside world.  Then, back at the Biltmore a panel attended, The Classic Weird in 2018, and out again for a late lunchette before 4 p.m.’s Vampires:  The Next Generation which I moderated, and a final panel, Unspoken Clichés.

And that was pretty much that — with nothing planned for those who might not be going to the awards banquet, after some chatting with folk in the Biltmore lobby, etc., it was to the Subway across the street for a sandwich to go, then reviewing a busy and enjoyable weekend at my hotel and an early bedtime.  And thus, well rested, I could find out at something before 7 a.m. Sunday that, re. getting home, the adventure had actually not quite yet ended.

But we already know about that.

“Writers & The Animals They Love” is the overarching theme of Heather Baker Weidner’s a bit off the beaten track PENS, PAWS, AND CLAWS blog, on which books take a back seat to the Goth Cat Triana.  Well, not entirely, TOMBS:  A CHRONICLE OF LATTER-DAY TIMES OF EARTH and THE TEARS OF ISIS do still get considerable mention, but their pictures are displayed well below that of you know who.  And subjects covered include not just such standards as the difference between horror and dark fantasy, but also the use of pets in stories and favorite movies/books with animals in them.  Angela Carter’s “The Company of Wolves” would be an example of the latter, while, in general, for a slightly different take on the usual “author interview” of yours truly, be welcome to press here.

Ms. Weidner also mentions that her readers like to leave comments, so feel free to join them with your own.  I’ll make an effort to stop by to answer them two or three times later today, before getting ready to leave for StokerCon Thursday morning.




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