Posts Tagged ‘The Tears of Isis’

Well, sort of.  Kind of.  Hark us back to April 1 this year, where we may recall that CREEPY CAMPFIRE QUARTERLY, scheduled later this year to reprint my story “In the Octopus’s Garden” (originally published in 69 FLAVORS OF PARANOIA, March-April 1999, as well as lead story in my 2013 collection THE TEARS OF ISIS), was not going to be coming out after all.  And so that was that.  Such things do happen.

But now it seems there may be a spark in the old campfire yet.  Through the efforts of fellow CREEPY QUARTERLY author-to-be Leo X. Robertson, CREEPY CAMPFIRE, zombie-like, is once again stirring out of its grave as a possible special adoptee,  possibly in two volumes, via Jesse Dedman of DEADMAN’S TOME.  And best of all, this won’t interfere with the TALES TO TERRIFY acceptance of “In the Octopus’s Garden” also announced in April 1’s post, to publish in the latter part of 2017, since that involves audio rights alone which CREEPY CAMPFIRE will not include.

More to be announced as it becomes known, but for now a special tip of the hat to Leo and Jesse for showing that, sometimes, you can’t keep a good CREEPY project down!

Another month, another interview, so it may seem.  See, e.g., April 7, March 13, January 10 . . . and that’s just this year!   But come June 1, TOMBS:  A CHRONICLE OF LATTER DAY TIMES OF EARTH is expected to be published and it’s all a part of getting the word out.  Besides, interviews can be interesting both to reader and interviewee if one puts one’s mind to it.  And even fun.

So word came today from blogger Gwendolyn Kiste who interviews quite a number of writers, samples of which can be found by pressing hereThank you so much for your responses!  At this point, it appears that the interview should go live on my website in mid-May.  I will definitely send you an email when I post it.  

And there we have it.  More secrets bared:  My writing habits (some of them quite bad).  The influence of music.  Contributions by the goth cat Triana.  And with this the latest on THE TEARS OF ISIS and, lest we forget, TOMBS:  A CHRONICLE OF LATTER-DAY TIMES OF EARTH.  One of the fun things, in fact, is that each interviewer is different as well, not just in their questions (some of these, of course, may be common to more than one interview) but also in their approaches to questioning.  Matter of fact?  Interested in detail?  Fun-loving?  Quirky?

Search on “Interview” in the “search here” box at the upper right for a tour of the dates I’ve listed above — a possible project for an otherwise dull rainy day?  And check here in May for a link to the newest by Gwendolyn Kiste as soon as I have it!

Along with yesterday morning’s marathon interview, Friday also brought these more low-profile items:

1.  A contract by email “signed” and sent back to TALES TO TERRIFY for permission to podcast “In the Octopus’s Garden” (cf. April 1), originally published in 69 FLAVORS OF PARANOIA for March-April 1999 and also the lead prose tale in THE TEARS OF ISIS;

2.  Receipt by street mail of my copy of the corrected contract, countersigned by publisher Scary Dairy Press (cf. March 8, et al.) and with payment included, for “Swarms” as a reprint in MOTHER’S REVENGE, planned to be out for Earth Day, April 22;

3.  Also by street mail, two copies of a contract received from Smart Rhino Publications for my science fiction story “Golden Age” to be reprinted in ZIPPERED FLESH 3 (see March 13, February 21, et al.), one countersigned by me this morning and left out for return mail pickup.

All in all, not a bad way to wind down the week.

Secrets, secrets.  What was my “first ever” book, and why?  (Hint, long out of print, you usually won’t see it in my current bio-notes.)  Do I claim a specific writing style?  Does my novel TOMBS:  A CHRONICLE OF LATTER-DAY TIMES OF EARTH have an ultimate message for readers (and what is the relation of TOMBS to what dramatists call “the five act structure”)?  In the process of coming up with a title, how did TOMBS differ from THE TEARS OF ISIS?  And now the answers, to questions I wouldn’t have dreamed up myself and many, many more have been revealed, courtesy of blogger extraordinaire Fiona Mcvie on AUTHORSINTERVIEWS.

And maybe a little more will be there on ISIS as well, or how Peter Lorre might have made a good “Ghoul-Poet.”  If curious, press here.  (And if interest is piqued by what you find, links are provided at the bottom for pre-ordering TOMBS as well as ordering THE TEARS OF ISIS — or if in a hurry, just click on their pictures on this page in the center column.)

It happens sometimes.  It’s usually not reported here, but sometimes a magazine or book that’s accepted a story fails to be published.  But life must go on, yes?  Such has been the fate of “In The Octopus’s Garden,” originally published in 69 FLAVORS OF PARANOIA, March-April 1999, which we might recall had been accepted as a reprint for CREEPY CAMPFIRE QUARTERLY for publication later this year (see June 5 2016).  But then in November . . . well, these things happen.

Fast forward to this month, lots going on, but for thirty solid days in March no new acceptances, story or poetry, to be reported until Friday afternoon, March 31, and an email time-stamped 2:45 p.m.:  Thank you for submitting “In the Octopus’s Garden” to TALES TO TERRIFY.  We loved this story and would like to accept it for publication.  So you lose one, you win it back.  TALES TO TERRIFY is a podcast with “In the Octopus’s Garden” tentatively set to air “somewhere around July-December 2017.”  But for those who can’t wait or would like to read it in print as well, it’s also lead story in THE TEARS OF ISIS which can be ordered by clicking its picture in the center column or pressing here.

If you’re familiar with Smart Rhino’s anthologies (and we certainly hope you are!), you may remember his stories “The Wellmaster’s Daughter” in UNCOMMON ASSASSINS, and “Labyrinth” in INSIDIOUS ASSASSINS.  His story “Golden Age” will be published in ZIPPERED FLESH 3, now in production.  So marks the start of Monday’s outing of Smart Rhino Press Editor/Publisher Weldon Burge’s blog, BULLETS AND BUTTERFLIES.  Here you will find things concerning my collection THE TEARS OF ISIS and the lure of short stories, as well as my upcoming novel TOMBS:  A CHRONICLE OF LATTER-DAY TIMES OF EARTH, though of the latter the publication date is now set for June (i.e. rather than “spring,” which only means things sometimes get out of date; also the poet Allan Poe may be better known as Edgar Allan, but typos can happen too).  Also the blog itself  may seem familiar, having also been published in Smart Rhino Publications’s own January NEWSLETTER (see January 18).  But as Weldon himself says on his Facebook page:  Just posted my interview with Bram Stoker nominee (and frequent writer for Smart Rhino Publications) James Dorr.  His story “Golden Age,” will appear in the upcoming ZIPPERED FLESH 3.  He has some great advice for writers from his own experience.  So maybe it will be worth reading anew.

Or in any event for those new to this blog it can be found here.

This was to be the one on poetry, last month’s premiere “Second Thursday Players Pub Spoken Word Series,” co-sponsored by the Bloomington Writers Guild and local tavern and music venue Players Pub, being dominated by prose fiction — including, ahem, my opening reading of “River Red” from THE TEARS OF ISIS (cf. February 10).  And so it was, mostly, with even its musical component being poetry-based via Evansville Indiana group SHAKESPEARE’S MONKEY, a “poetry band” reminiscent of 1950s coffeehouse safe_image.phppoetry accompanied with jazz (albeit in this case, guitars and hand percussion), who we’ve met before at the Bloomington Arts Festival Spoken Word Stage (see September 4).  The featured readers this time out were Writers Guild Chair Tony Brewer whose poems included a Pushcart Prize nominee, local poet Eric Rensberger who began his reading with a guitar accompanied “Medicine Show” spiel introducing bartender “Dr. Joe” and the pub itself before continuing with the more “serious literary part,” and First Sundays Prose Series Chair Joan Hawkins breaking the pattern with two prose “creative memoirs.”  Then the open mike session added four readers of whom I was second, reading three pieces from VAMPS (A RETROSPECTIVE), “La Méduse,” “Émile’s Ghosts,” and “Night Child.”

Then for another quick note, I’ve added two pieces to “Poetry (Essays)” under PAGES in the far right column, my ILLUMEN feature “It Begins With the Sound” (see November 5, et al.) and “What Is a Novel in Stories” (see February 13), the latter admittedly really about my upcoming TOMBS:  A CHRONICLE OF LATTER-DAY TIMES OF EARTH, but springing from Edgar Allan Poe’s essay “The Poetic Principle.”

This was a first, the Players Pub Spoken Word Series (see January 29), premiered Thursday night from 6 to 9 by the Bloomington Writers Guild in conjunction with local bar and music venue Players Pub in off-downtown Bloomington.  This will continue on second Thursdays every month, combining musical interludes with readings of various sorts.  This time, for instance, the readings were prose, with the musical guests the group Urban Deer, while next month’s will most likely feature poetry and, from out of town, the group Shakespeare’s Monkey.  The name of the series is not necessarily fixed yet either, but a flavor is already being established, more freewheeling and possibly “adult” in nature than, say, the more formal First Sunday Prose and Last Sunday Poetry programs.

That said, the first reading ever for this was by . . . me.  The piece read was my story “River Red” from THE TEARS OF ISIS, but with a brief introduction from TOMBS:  A CHRONICLE OF LATTER-DAY TIMES OF EARTH (“River Red” being set in the “Tombs” universe, even if not in the latter book) to help set the mood.  And also . . . well, maybe . . . as a sort of commercial to push both titles.  This was followed by Shayne Laughter, who we’ve met on several occasions before, with a tale called “Incident at Grandmother’s Cottage,” a part of a fiction work in progress; Arbutus Cunningham (a.k.a. Hester), a Saturday morning radio star on local WFHB with four brief and mostly funny (the exception, the third called “After the War,” combining survival and sadness) semi-fictionalized, off-the-wall reflections; and triana3c2001playwright and comedy performance artist Stevie Jay with longer excerpts from a newer work, “Falling Through the Cracks:  a homeopathic remedy for the New Millennium in one dose.”  The audience totaled some 15 to 18 people (not counting bar personnel), most of whom seemed to stay for the whole nearly three-hour period, and once warmed up seemed quite enthusiastic.

Then another note on new goth kitten Triana, who has momentarily held still and in the light long enough for a new photo portrait, this amongst the jumble and clutter of the printer corner of the computer cave.  But the thing is, missing from all other pictures thus far, she has lovely golden-brownish eyes, now seen here for the first time!

Back for 2017, this afternoon saw the new year’s first “Last Sunday Poetry Reading & Open Mic” (see November 28, et al.), co-sponsored by the Bloomington Writers Guild and the Monroe County Convention Center.  Featured poets this time were Lisa Low, in her final year in the MFA program at Indiana University, whose reading covered such subjects as grocery stores, ghosts, and gold, ending with a group of poems from a work in progress about a girl named Ruby; and Stephen Hopkins, “born in Texas but raised in the Midwest, bloomingtonwritersguild[and] moved all over Ohio, often,” an IU PhD candidate who read works from his recent chapbook HYMNS OF PERPETUAL MOTION.  This was followed by snacks and an open mike session in which I was last of six participants, with five short, relatively light poems about vampires, “The Vampire’s Reflection,” “An Unsuitable Kiss for the New Year,” “Something New,” “Nothing Better,” and “The Vampiress’s Embarrassment.”

Also announced was a new Writers Guild “Second Thursdays” evening series to be held each month at Bloomington’s Players Pub, beginning February 9.  While programs will vary, the premiere offering will highlight prose readings,  including a short tale by me from THE TEARS OF ISIS, “River Red,” set in the same universe as my upcoming TOMBS:  A CHRONICLE OF LATTER-DAY TIMES OF EARTH.

So the first answer starts with a citation to “Allan Poe.”  That’s Edgar Allan Poe, of course, but what’s in a word — I still stand by the answer.  And thus the promised interview by Weldon Burge for Smart Rhino Publications (cf. January 11, 8), in conjunction with a Kickstarter campaign for their upcoming ZIPPERED FLESH 3 anthology, is now live.  A mention is made at the very beginning about my Smart Rhino story appearances, “The Wellmaster’s Daughter” in UNCOMMON ASSASSINS, “Labyrinth” in INSIDIOUS ASSASSINS, and “Golden Age” in the upcomi8451b32b-e3c4-41cb-8f3e-7c6834708f13ng ZIPPERED FLESH volume, but that’s not what the interview is about.  Rather, with reference to Poe as well as my Stoker(R) nominated collection THE TEARS OF ISIS, we talk about short story writing in general and why, as a writer, I find short forms more interesting than novels.  But then novels come up too with reference to TOMBS: A CHRONICLE OF LATTER-DAY TIMES OF EARTH (expected in June this year, not really “spring,” but that’s because of a change in schedule after my original biographical notes were in) and what is, exactly, a novel-in-stories, also known as a “mosaic novel”?  And, more importantly, why TOMBS is put together in that style.

The Poe citation, incidentally, is to his essay “The Poetic Principle,” which I believe he meant to apply to prose fiction as well.  But to read the whole interview, including some things on the challenges and joys of writing, and what to expect once one has written, why not press here?




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