Posts Tagged ‘Thanksgiving’

So it might have been more a celebration for Halloween, first published on FILMSCHOOLREJECTS.COM on October 18, but even if just for the first three-quarters of the year (January 2018 through September), Rob Hunter’s “The Best Horror Movies of 2018 So Far” offers goodies worth a look any time of the year. And,  especially, for Thanksgiving weekend if sometimes the football games don’t thrill enough.

Well, see for yourself by pressing here!

 

(Triana, on the other hand, thinks she’ll just eat and eat. . . .)

Advertisements

(Triana plans to eat herself senseless. . . .)

Tis the season, well into the run-up to Halloween.  Thus in today’s email, from C.P. Dunphey of Gehenna Publishing, [w]e are happy to announce that from the 25th-31st of October, we will discount all our titles to $0.99 on Amazon.  We may have some difficulty running the promotion for HINNOM MAGAZINE Issue 003, but rest assured, we will do our best to include the Halloween-themed issue in the lot.

We advise you to buckle up and prepare for one haunting Hallows’ Eve with these terrifying tales.

He says “all our titles” from which presumably not only the two already published issues of HINNOM MAGAZINE but YEAR’S BEST BODY HORROR 2017 ANTHOLOGY including my story “Flesh” (cf. September 25, et al.), among other books, will be included along with HINNOM’s third issue; also given the low sale price cited it’s most likely for electronic format, but no matter the details it sounds like a sale worth looking into, in less than ten days time.  More details here as they are learned.  And for those who can’t wait, YEAR’S BEST BODY HORROR 2017 ANTHOLOGY is available on Amazon now in both Kindle and paperback editions for which, to take a look, one can press here.

Also received from Bards and Sages Publishing, a galley proof for THE SOCIETY OF MISFIT STORIES, Volume 1, with its lead story by me, “By Force and Against the King’s Peace” (originally published in ALFRED HITCHCOCK’S MYSTERY MAGAZINE; see January 19, et al.).  This will be the promised print collection of stand-alone electronic chapbooks that came out last year under the “Misfit Stories” aegis, hopefully to be out “in both large format trade paperback and hardcover for libraries” in time for Thanksgiving.

So a member of my writers group, presumably planning to write a “Krampus” story herself but declining to actually go to the local parade right here in town on Saturday night, made me this request:  You might describe to me the sights, smells, sounds, etc. of the local parade.  I imagine kids shrieking, music, smells of food for sale, etc.  Who is it that hands out candy; was it “angels?”  And the Krampuses have switches?  (I read that the traditional Krampus does.  I know he’s Austrian.  He has relatives like Klaubeuf.)  Sensing an attempt to get me to write part of her story for her, or at least do her research, and possibly in a cynical mood, I replied (after a brief snark that, re. “smells,” there would be crowds and undoubtedly body odor but it would be too cold to smell it) thusly:

I’m jaded myself, I remember the first one when you could march along the route with the Angels and Krampi yourself.  But a quick rundown (oh wait, I copied the stuff from Facebook for you in my other email, it’ll tell you what to expect!), based on last year’s which would seem to be pretty much what will happen this year too, were you to go at 5, you’d probably mill around with people in the area behind the Showers Bldg (City Hall), you’d probably find a stand or a person giving out the “Naughty” krampus22and “Nice” stickers and choose the one you want to paste on your jacket (Hint:  it’s considered bush league to paste on both).  There may also be some food stands (or trucks, since those are “in” these days, the trucks probably parked on the street)   Also some game-type things to help keep the kiddies quiet, though, half-frozen, most won’t be too noisy.  As 6 p.m. works around, it’ll have gotten rather dark and someone will announce the parade will be starting and suggest you head south along Madison St. to watch it.  You do, then you stand with others in the cold for awhile, then see some kind of lighted stuff (majorettes with light-up batons?  Who knows) way in the distance to the south.  In what seems like ages, it will finally get to where you are and move on past, Angels (giving out candy to the “nice”), Bishop Nick, maybe in the parade proper they’ll have the cart with the cage with a couple of “naughty” kids in it, maybe some other stuff, plus guys in Krampus suits.  These last may or may not be holding switches or sticks but I doubt they’ll actually hit anyone — lawsuits, you know, not to mention possible criminal charges.  But they will run toward children near the parade route with “Naughty” stickers yelling “Rowrrr!”  And quite quickly, considering how long it seemed to take for it to get to you, it will be passed.  Madison Street will seem deserted, the wind whistling, perhaps a piece or two of trash blowing along the now-empty expanse, and you’ll look around at other people looking as puzzled as you.  Is that all there is? you’ll think.  Then you remember what you’d read on Facebook, that there may be a sort of after thing, maybe an hour or more later, when some of the Krampuses will go around to the local bars, possibly go inside and yell “Rowrrr!” but you won’t stay around that long to find out.  Nor will anyone you know remember having done so in previous years, but if you really want my experience, I usually continue south to Krogers to see if anything’s on sale (one gala year, I stopped in at the Wendy’s to use the rest room), then go home.  Another year, another Krampus parade.

Now that it’s over, I can add that it’s really more fun than that, though (as sort of a one-trick pony) it’s still rather short.  I only got downtown in time for the parade itself so I can’t report on pre-parade activities, but I can better define “the lighted stuff . . . way in the distance” as lighted hula hoops followed by some guys holding torches (“fire stuff” as a security guard called it, using that a means to get the audience back to the sides of the road where they belonged — clever, I call it) and, while the rustic cart of caged children of years past wasn’t there (though the parade ended with a motorized mini-vehicle with one child), the first krampuses were “forcing” chained kids to trudge behind them.  Also, if anyone asks, I wore a “Nice” sticker because, as I’ve explained in the past (see December 9 2012; also December 6 2015) Nice gets you free candy (only one package this time though — maybe the angels were tightening their celestial belts) while “Naughty” gets you harassment.  And anyway if you’re truly naughty who’d tell the truth?

Which brings us to Sunday and 2016’s final Bloomington Writers Guild “First Sunday Prose Reading and Open Mic” (cf. November 7, et al.), co-sponsored and venued by Boxcar Books.  Featured readers this time were Annette Oppenlander, who we’ve met before, with a talk on how her young adult ESCAPE FROM THE PAST novel trilogy was first conceived followed by an excerpt from the third volume, published just last week; award-winning documentary filmmaker, eco-journalist, etc., Kalynn Huffman Brower with an excerpt from an “ages ten and up” science fiction novel in progress plus a part of an autobiographical essay; and Andrew Hubbard who continued a non-fiction piece begun two months back  on Nebraska’s Chimney Rock and its surrounding area.  Then when open mike time came, with an audience still thirteen people strong (including the man asleep on the couch in back), I read fourth in a field of five (that is, followed by MC Joan Hawkins and thus, technically, not quite ending the session) with a near-future Thanksgiving set 500-word story, written for a call by THE STONESLIDE CORRECTIVE shortly after a recent election, for stories on the subject of “aftermath.”

Time will tell if it gets accepted (or comes true) and, in the meantime, since next month starts on a Sunday with Boxcar Books closed for New Year’s Day, that’s the last of the First Sunday Prose Reading series until February 5, 2017.

So it would still be a while before delivery since the Amazon “publication date” is June 1 2017, but there it is.  To see for yourself, press here.  TOMBS:  A CHRONICLE OF LATTER-DAY TIMES OF EARTH is now listed on Amazon in a print edition with a “pre-order price guarantee” of $14.95.  And the listing hastombswithsubtitle its little quirks too, namely that the author’s biography, as in the anthology DARK HORIZONS, is for James C. Simpson, not me (see also November 14).  But I wrote it.  Honest!

Still, isn’t that neat, for a quick little late-Thanksgiving surprise? A special thing to be thankful for, that the novel-in-stories is that much nearer, including with a slightly updated cover.  Hopefully, eventually, with the right biography too, but there’s still time for that — and, maybe especially in that I ran across it quite serendipitously, with Thanksgiving and all, I thought this worth sharing.

ZenOfTheDead

HAPPY THANKSGIVING

‘Tis the season to be commercial, but sales are sales, so a quick reminder that Untreed Reads Publishing’s Cyber Monday sale, including my chapbooks PEDS, I’M DREAMING OF A. . . ., VANITAS, and the YEAR’S END New Year’s Eve anthology with my story “Appointment In Time” are being offered at a 1-day only forty-percent off Cyber Monday discount on all titles (cf. November 25 – discounts will appear on the payment page during checkout).  For more info press here.  Also Perpetual Motion Machine Publishing’s Thanksgiving Weekend sale ends today (see November 29, et al., below), with a twenty-percent off discount on THE TEARS OF ISIS included, for more on which press here.

Then, on a slightly different note, A ROBOT, A CYBORG, AND A MARTIAN WALK INTO A SPACE BAR Editor J. Alan Erwine (see September 26, et al.) has announced that a kickstarter to help defray costs for the anthology will continue for two weeks more.  He stresses that the anthology will definitely be published in any case, but a successful drive will help with (ahem!) payments to the authors.  More information can be found here.photo-main

And who might these authors be?  To quote publisher Nomadic Delirium:  “A ROBOT, A CYBORG, AND A MARTIAN WALK INTO A SPACE BAR is a serious literary work of science fiction and fantasy stories that look to delve into…no, not really.  This book is a collection of comedic science fiction and fantasy stories written by some truly talented authors.

“The book includes stories from Francis W. Alexander, Lou J. Berger, Wayne Carey, James Dorr, Laura Givens, Alan Ira Gordon, John Grey, Carlos Hernandez, Gilda A. Herrera, Ahmed A. Khan, Sheryl Normandeau, Robert Lowell Russell, John Skylar, Glen R. Stripling, and Scott Virtes.”

My story in this is a romantic reverie concerning a sentient robotic toaster called, oddly enough, “Toast.”

Wendy3

Wednesday the Cave Cat, Once Upon a Time (Wednesday’s webpage can be found here)

This one’s hot off the griddle, from Perpetual Motion Machine Publishing’s Max Booth III:

Starting now until Saturday we will be having a Black Friday sale on our web store. So, if you have a book with us or you’re in one of our anthologies, some promo is in order.

20% off all titles, paperback and ebook
Promo code: BLACK14

This means THE TEARS OF ISIS (“named for the goddess, no relation to current Mideastern news events”) will be on sale at a twenty percent off discount for9780988748842_p0_v2_s260x420 the next two days.  Plenty of time for Christmas gifting — or for one’s self if you don’t have it already.  And plenty of time for delivery too!  To take advantage, just click on the book’s picture in the center column, or go directly to the THE TEARS OF ISIS’s page on the PMMP site by pressing here, then add the promotion code, BLACK14, when you check out.

Of course when you’ve done that (are you sure you don’t want a second copy while you’re at it, perhaps for some special relative or friend?) you might want to browse the PMMP store for other titles.  These can be reached from the page for THE TEARS OF ISIS or, to go directly to the general PMMP store page, by pressing here, where you might also check out the Kurt Vonnegut tribute anthology SO IT GOES with my story of modern mores, “Dead Girls, Dying Girls.”

Also just in, one site to watch out for is T. GENE DAVIS’S SPECULATIVE BLOG, which “releases a family-friendly speculative story every Monday, mostly by guest authors.”  Rather like DAILY SCIENCE FICTION it can be subscribed to for free and, offering a flat rate of $50.00 per story, the quality is generally high.  So, literally less than an hour ago as I write this, came the word on a story I’d sent earlier in the month, “Congratulations! I love your story, ‘Flightless Rats’, and want to publish it on my blog and in the annual anthology.”

“Flightless Rats” is a tale of the vampiress Aimée (who we’ve met before in “Casket Girls,” cf. April 17, et al.), a night in 19th century New Orleans, and a bit of Biblical apocrypha.  More will be reported as it becomes known, but in the meantime those who wish to can check out what will become her new home, and maybe sign up to follow it as well, by pressing here.

But night is the best time to be awake, or, depending on one’s day job, perhaps the only time to be awake.  (Full disclosure:  I’m doing a first draft of this about six hours after returning from a checkup at the clinic I used to have a day job at — so maybe I’m still a bit dotty myself?)   Anyhow, this is a site my middle niece Jodie put me on to Tuesday evening and, as to the insomniac part of it, I make no guarantees either way.  But some of the videos are horrible fun!

So at your own risk, if you’d like to see in lieu of reviews a mini-film festival of your own (and then if you’d like to, send me a review of your favorite as a comment), please to press here.  (Listing is courtesy of Chris Tanner, originally posted on Listverse April 29 2014.)




  • My Books

    (Click on image for more information)
  • Chapbooks

  • Poetry

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 1,542 other followers