Posts Tagged ‘Science Fiction’

Another sale, this one by DriveThru Fiction according to Untreed Reads Publishing’s Jay Hartman:  If you’re getting this email, it’s because one or more of your titles have been included in DriveThruFiction.com’s special Halloween sale.  They’re going to be offering 31% ImDreamingoff all horror/ghost titles through the end of October.  And two of the titles offered are my short story Christmas horror chapbook I’M DREAMING OF A . . . and the Untreed Reads New Year’s Eve anthology YEAR’S END with its lead story by me, “Appointment in Time,” as well as my non-horror dystopian science fiction (and hence not part of the sale, but still cheap at only $1.50) novelette PEDS.  For more, press here, where you’ll find seventeen titles from various publishers (mainly anthologies with stories by me in them) concerning me, plus two, PRESIDENTIAL PULP and THE ADVENTURE MEGAPACK, that have nothing to do with me whatsoever.  Whereas for Untreed Read titles on sale only, including ones mostly not by me, one can press here.

Advertisements

Who knows what Friday the Thirteenth will bring, but yesterday, Thursday the twelfth, was rather nice despite a gloomy, Octobery day.  The highlight, a first poetry acceptance for me by STAR*LINE new editor Vince Gotera, for a “horrorku” titled “Wet Work.”  Horrorku?  Well, it’s sort of supposed to be horror plus haiku though it’s really more just a three line poem with a vaguely 5-7-5 syllable count (mine is 5-7-4) on a horror subject, which in my case would more likely be epigrammatic, although not always.  But to the point, even if lacking walruses (cf. October 1) “Wet Work” does have a mermaid.

Then Thursday night brought the Bloomington Writers Guild co-sponsored “Second Thursday Players Pub Spoken Word Series” (cf. June 8, et al.) with, this time, a special reading performance of PREMIUM TAFT, a two-act play by Tom Trent, with musical interludes by Jason Fickel.  PREMIUM TAFT is, to read from the Facebook description, “[a] fictional time-traveling comedy about William Howard Taft’s whistle-stop presidential campaign appearance at the Mitchell Opera House in 1908 . . .  or maybe 1958?”  Or science fiction meets farce, in this case with an Indiana small-town ambience with grifters, politicos, greed, and rock ‘n’ roll.  And lots of fun.

This was followed by “open mic” presentations of which mine came in fourth of six, to an audience of about 15 people.  Noting that it had been a gloomy, Octobery day, ideal as a precursor for Halloween, I read four poems from VAMPS (A RETROSPECTIVE), “Night Child,” “La Méduse,” “Moonlight Swimming,” and “Chagrin du Vampire.”

It is here!  ZIPPERED FLESH 3:  YET MORE TALES OF BODY ENHANCEMENTS GONE BAD (see September 26, et al.) arrived this evening, all 371 pages of it, and a handsome book it is too.  Or, to quote three opinions from the back cover:   In Zippered Flesh 3, Editor Weldon Burge has done a masterful job of combining work from well-known masters like Jack Ketchum and Graham Masterton with newer writers.  But it is the original work by newcomers like L.L. Soares and Meghan Acuri that stands out for me. …  Highly recommended. — Gene O’Neill, author of The Hitchhiking Effect:  A Retrospective Collection

“Closer” by Charles Colyott is a wonderfully poignant and romantic story. …  “Going Green” by Christine Morgan is so original, timely, and well-written it deserves special mention. …  Kudos to Burge for putting together another fine anthology of cutting-edge fiction. — Paul Dale Anderson, author of The Instruments of Death series

Hardcore horror that ranges from the socially relevant to the scatologically repulsive — the shock here is like “The Scream’ made flesh.” — Mort Castle, editor of On Writing Horror:  A Handbook by the Horror Writers Association

Mine in fact is one of the gentler pieces, “Golden Age,” a reflective science fiction tale originally published in MINDSPARKS in Spring 1994, one of seven reprints by authors such as Billie Sue Mosiman and William Nolan out of a total of nineteen stories, to end the collection.  But see for yourself — if you dare — by checking it out on Amazon here.

A disturbing film isn’t one that gleefully stands with its arms outstretched to embrace buckets of blood.  A disturbing film is something else, something more — an experience that’s undeniably unsettling whilst it plays out, but even more powerful in the lingering sting it leaves behind.  A truly disturbing movie doesn’t slap you around in your seat on first viewing — instead, it burrows its way into your brain and replays in your thoughts for weeks at a time afterwards.

There are plenty of lists out there that attempt to gather the most disconcerting films of all time in one place, but here at We Got This Covered we’re gonna evade your textbook entries on this occasion — A SERBIAN FILM, HUMAN CENTIPEDE, CANNIBAL HOLOCAUST etc. — and go for a slightly different flavor.  These movies don’t simply disgust by serving as commendable pieces of exploitation cinema, but work in a rather different and more complex way to deeply, deeply disturb.  Watching them once will be more than enough. . .

So starts Gaz Lloyd’s “10 Deeply Disturbing Movies That You Need To Watch, But Only Once,” brought to us by WEGOTTHISCOVERED.COM.  To cut to the chase, to see the list for yourself press here (noting that a few of these specify the original movie, not the remake).  For myself, I think I’ve seen four of the ten, but will need to check further when I’m at home (I’m writing this at a library computer right now) to see if I still have two of the titles.  And, tonight, maybe watch AUDITION again?

Nah, maybe not.

“Now comrades, I am finally convinced that a dream of mine — space travel — for which I have given the theoretical foundations, will be realized.  I believe that many of you will be witnesses of the first journey beyond the atmosphere.  In the Soviet Union we have many young pilots. . . (and) I place my most daring hopes in them.  They will help to actualize my discoveries and will prepare the gifted builders of the first space vehicle.  Heroes and men of courage will inaugurate the first airways:  Earth to Moon orbit, Earth to Mars orbit, and still farther; Moscow to the Moon, Kaluga to Mars!”

The square erupted in cheers, led by none other than the country’s leader Joseph Stalin.

Twenty-two years later, the Soviet Union launched the first artificial satellite into space aboard the R-7 rocket.  After its flight into space on October 4, 1957 — 60 years ago today — Sputnik-1 quickly entered into legend, and struck fear in the United States about falling behind in the space race.  But such a momentous launch likely couldn’t have happened without Tsiolkovsky, a mathematician, founding father of modern rocketry, and a science-fiction visionary that even inspired Arthur C. Clarke.

Thus starts today’s anniversary internet gleaning, “How a Russian Scientist’s Sci-Fi Genius Made Sputnik Possible” by Matt Blitz on POPULAR MECHANICS.COM, on the Russian visionary Konstantin E. Tsiolkovsky, rocket pioneer and, yes, science fiction author, remembering the October 4 1957 launch of the first artificial Earth satellite, Sputnik.  Some of us are so old we remember that day, even now when we’ve just celebrated a few weeks ago a space probe’s demise in crashing on the planet Saturn.  And some of us so young that we might live to see the first colony on Mars.  And some of us who became science fiction fans, or even scientists — or even writers — may share in a tip of the hat to those times, though Tsiolkovsky himself, born just over a hundred years before in September 1857, had died twenty-two years before the launch, on September 19 1935.

For more, one may press here.  And for even more than that, for the rocketry details also from POPULARMECHANICS.COM, please to peruse “The Rocket that Launched Sputnik and Started the Space Race” by Anatoly Zak by pressing here.

So, okay, this is another teeny horror/dark humor poem I read at the Bloomington Writers Guild’s “Last Sunday Poetry” last week (cf. September 24), but this being the afternoon of October’s “First Sunday Prose” (more on which later this p.m. or Monday morning), why not?  Actually it came up while perusing “Bloodizabeth’s Meat & Greet Dinner Party” on SLASHERMONSTER.COM and seeing one comment mentioning The Beatlles and “I Am the Walrus.”  So having this variant, as it were, in the quiver, why not shoot it into the “Comments” section as a comment upon the comment?  (And thus here, as an “extra,” for you.)

I AM A WALRUS

i have a walrus mustache,
& am hot for mermaids

This is the time for second quarter royalties to (as it were) come home, and the first report was received this week.  One may recall that royalties for individual short stories in an anthology, for instance, or possibly as stand-alone chapbooks are rarely large, and it’s been my custom to avoid embarrassment on both sides by declining to identify either the publisher or the exact amount.  So let it suffice just to say a significant recipient this time around will be the US Postal Service for selling the stamp to send the check to me.

Then, continuing on the topic of matters postal, I stopped by the post office this afternoon needing to buy stamps for myself, and, having been tipped off, asked for two sheets (in this case of twenty stamps each) of the one honoring last month’s solar eclipse (cf. August 22).  The tip?  If you press your thumb on the stamp’s picture of the occluded sun, rolling it a bit perhaps to assure that all has been warmed by its touch, and then remove it — voila!  The picture you’ll see is now one of the moon!

What horror anthology on body enhancements wouldn’t include gross-out fiction?  This book has it in spades.  But, this collection of stories goes far beyond that.  Here you will also find science fiction, surreal fiction, fantasy, and even a full serving of dark humor.  Disturbing, perverse, often gut-wrenching (pun intended) stories — all between the covers of this anthology!

Nineteen chilling tales by some of the best horror and suspense writers today.  Definitely not for the squeamish!

What anthology is it?  It’s ZIPPERED FLESH 3:  YET MORE TALES OF BODY ENHANCEMENTS GONE BAD (see September 19, August 5, et al.) which, according to Weldon Burge of Smart Rhino Publications, has now been published as of September 22 in paperback format.  For more information/ ordering press here.  ZIPPERED FLESH 3 is the “other” body horror anthology (cf. just below) and, at 388 pages, also a hefty book my part of which is the final story, “Golden Age,” a less “gut-wrenching” than some SF story of reasoned reflection, but possibly just right to cap the anthology.

The human body has long been the enemy of horror films.  One only has to look as early as THE INVISIBLE MAN or THE WOLFMAN for manifestations of physical forms undergoing irrevocable change.  But the body horror genre encompasses three distinct variations of organic terror:  invasion via disease or decomposition, violation through mutilation or penetration, and transformation from a reconstitution of biology.

Body horror?  Yes, today’s email includes an announcement from Gehenna & Hinnom Editor/Publisher C.P. Dunphey that Shane Ramirez’s “Deconstructing Body Horror,” part of which is quoted above, as originally published in SOUNDONSIGHT.ORG and POPTOPIQ.COM has been selected asbh2 the introduction for YEAR’S BEST BODY HORROR 2017 ANTHOLOGY, the contents page for the rest of which has appeared below (cf. August 10, also September 18, 13, et al.).  This is a large book at 400-some pages, with forty-plus stories, expected out on September 30 and available for e-copy pre-order by pressing here.  And my cut in the carnage?  A story called “Flesh,” the surrealistic tale of a man of means and a nightmare-based need of a weighty nature.

Well, I couldn’t resist it, and I do have a story in it, an actually gentle science fiction musing called “Golden Age” at last place in the contents.  But Smart Rhino Publications’s ZIPPERED FLESH 3: YET MORE TALES OF BODY ENHANCEMENT GONE BAD (cf. August 5, June 19, et al.) promises, overall, not to be a book for the squeamish, as you may find out too by pressing here.

But — WARNING! — best not be eating when you get to the part, after you’ve gotten a view of an advance copy of the book itself, at the very end.




  • My Books

    (Click on image for more information)
  • Chapbooks

  • Poetry

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 1,052 other followers