Posts Tagged ‘NASA’

Move over Soyuz (cf. December 12), it looks like NASA has a new heavy-lift rocket ready to be on the launch pad next year.  And now there’s some talk that its maiden voyage could be a manned one.  No, not to Mars yet, just a lunar gallery-1458845021-slsloop-around for now, but apparently this is the one that may be used to go there eventually as well.  But see for yourself via “NASA Is Considering a Manned Flight for First SLS Launch,” by Jay Bennett, on POPULARMECHANICS.COM by pressing here.  And if that is intriguing see, also by Jay Bennett, “All You Need to Know NASA’s Mammoth SLS Rocket in Less Than 3 Minutes” by pressing here.

A couple of snippets today in an otherwise quiet week.  The first, the official schedule for the Bloomington Writers Guild’s Spoken Word Stage (cf. just below, August 14) has been announced on Facebook.  So far I’m still at 3:30 p.m. Sunday, September 4, for a half hour of horror — for which, and more, one can find the full schedule here.  For my slot I’ll most likely be reading my story “Raising the Dead,” originally published in AIRSHIPS AND AUTOMATONS (White Cat Publications, 2015) and set for release space-shuttle-atlantis-station-undocking-071911in spring-summer next year from Elder Signs Press as an independent chapter in TOMBS:  A CHRONICLE OF LATTER-DAY TIMES OF EARTH (see also, below).

And then, as an extra, I ran across an interesting item for space shuttle buffs, “NASA’s Space Shuttle By the Numbers:  30 Years of a Spaceflight Icon” by Tariq Malik on SPACE.COM, for which one can press here.  Finder’s credit this time goes to Steph P. Bianchini and THE EARTHIAN HIVEMIND in an entry interesting in its own right which can be found here.

A very pleasant early May outing began with the month’s Bloomington Writers Guild “First Sunday Prose Reading” (see April 6, February 1, et al.), co-sponsored by Boxcar Books.  Featured readers were Alyce Miller, award-winning author and Indiana University Graduate MFA program teacher and Director of Admissions, reading humorous essays on death in California and, having moved from there to here, the difficulties of becoming a “Hoosier”; poet, essayist, and MFA graduate Doug Paul Case with a series of “little prose poem micro-essay things,” humorous and ironic; and incoming THE INDIANA REVIEW Editor-in-Chief Peter Kispert with a first person story-essay on failed aspiring actors and reconstructed Netflix FATAL ATTRACTIONS episodes “where exotic animal owners are victimized by their pets.”  Although running late, the audience stayed for five open mike presentations that followed, of which mine, third in the lineup, was a recent as yet unsold story, “Medusa Steps Out,” about . . . well . . . an exotic animal owner of sorts who is also victimized by her pets (although, unlike the onlookers in this case, survives).

This was also the last “First Sunday” reading of the 2014-2015 season, the series now going on summer hiatus until August 2.  Other presentations will also be winding down as the month continues, but even now plans are also developing for 20111holst6, including a possible multi-disciplinary joining with the Bloomington Symphony Orchestra for a concert next February.  Along these lines, Writers Guild members had also been offered comp tickets for a production this evening of Gustav Holst’s THE PLANETS, Op. 32, by the Symphony Orchestra (joined at the haunting end of the final movement, “Neptune, the Mystic,” by the Bloomington Chamber Singers Women’s Chorus).  This, too, was a mixed media performance, accompanied by a slide show of the planets with NASA and ESA images put together and introduced by Indiana University Astronomy Professors Gabriel Lubell and Richard Durisen, thus perhaps to help us, the writers, stretch out imaginative wings.

In any event, it was a great show.

This is from PENNY4NASA.ORG via SPACE ADVOCATES NEWS, posted by Curtiss Thompson, for science fiction as well as science fact fans:  the top five advances in space science currently scheduled for this year.  The fourth one, in fact, may have already happened InternationalSpaceStation(while I don’t recall seeing it, it may have appeared within a story about resupplying the International Space Station), a soft landing on a platform at sea for a SpaceX first stage which, according to this, was scheduled for January 6.  But see all for yourself by checking here (and then, if inspired, consider using whatever strikes you to build a story or poem around).




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