Posts Tagged ‘Horror’

Today brings an email plus PDF proof from Editor Vince Gotera of the latest STAR*LINE for Fall 2017.  Please proof your piece(s) . . . as well as your listing(s) in the table of contents.  Could you please get back to me with any corrections ASAP?  In my case the page of interest is the twelfth with, sharing poems by Christine Sng and by R. Mac Jones, tucked neatly in at the bottom right my three-liner “Wet Work” (cf. October 13).  And this time, aha!, there was an error, one of the sort that would sneak past a computer spell-checker (whereas, ironically, the correct word might not).

So not to worry, I’ve sent back the change along with mailing and payment details.  More to come when the published issue arrives.

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Nine days to Halloween — how time does fly!  So to anticipate the upcoming holiday, THE HORROR TREE has just posted an interview of me, a long one by Ruschelle Dillon which even includes a question, with picture, about the Goth Cat Triana (with mention as well of dear departed Wednesday).  Did you know both of them have their own web pages (look for their names under “Pages” to the right)?  Captain Kirk or Jean Luc Picard?  (Yes, that’s one of the questions, but how do the “Casket Girls” fit in?)  Meldings of horror, science fiction, and romance.  Art and Death. Which TOMBS tale was “honorable mentioned” in Circlet Press’s BEST FANTASTIC EROTICA 2007?  Inspirational kitties.  Novels-in-stories.  And what does Poe’s “Poetic Principle” have to do with it all?

These and more — you know the routine!  Some things secret, some better well known, but all of them open for readers’ enjoyment by pressing here.

We may remember Heidi Angell.  To quote myself from June 9 this year, one of several posts linking to Heidi’s blog (cf. that date, et al.):  “It began innocently enough with a Meet the Author Interview.”  So begins Heidi Angell’s entry on her blog, AN ANGELL’S LIFE OF BOOKISH GOODNESS, complete with a link to the interview itself (cf., also, January 10), followed by a note and links for the three guest posts also published on TOMBS over the past several months (cf. May 18, et al.).  But that’s not all, even before that Heidi has posted a video of her first impressions which, by way of a preview, you can check out here (or, again, the link is there as well for you).  But then comes the main event, for which I can just say “Wow!”, Heidi Angell’s review of TOMBS:  A CHRONICLE OF LATTER-DAY TIMES OF EARTH, for which please press here.  There’s yet another item, though, in AN ANGELL’S LIFE, a reading of excerpts or stories from books to give would-be readers an even greater impression, under the aegis of STORY TIME.  An audio-visual lagniappe, if one will.  So Heidi and I selected one story that she might read from section III, “Intimations of Future Disaster,” a fairly short tale giving some of the TOMBS world’s background within the love story of Ipanema and Partimar, titled “Carnival of the Animals.”

“Carnival of the Animals” was first published as a stand-alone story in the literary ezine LENOX AVENUE for July-August 2005.  To quote its subtitle:  Two by two they passed through the New City, these the beasts of the Southern and Eastern wastes — and not just beasts only.  And as they went their way, there seemed so many that some questioned what was left.

For the story, press here.

Another sale, this one by DriveThru Fiction according to Untreed Reads Publishing’s Jay Hartman:  If you’re getting this email, it’s because one or more of your titles have been included in DriveThruFiction.com’s special Halloween sale.  They’re going to be offering 31% ImDreamingoff all horror/ghost titles through the end of October.  And two of the titles offered are my short story Christmas horror chapbook I’M DREAMING OF A . . . and the Untreed Reads New Year’s Eve anthology YEAR’S END with its lead story by me, “Appointment in Time,” as well as my non-horror dystopian science fiction (and hence not part of the sale, but still cheap at only $1.50) novelette PEDS.  For more, press here, where you’ll find seventeen titles from various publishers (mainly anthologies with stories by me in them) concerning me, plus two, PRESIDENTIAL PULP and THE ADVENTURE MEGAPACK, that have nothing to do with me whatsoever.  Whereas for Untreed Read titles on sale only, including ones mostly not by me, one can press here.

Perpetual Motion Machine Publications has announced a Friday the Thirteenth sale, to be in effect the entire Friday the Thirteenth Holiday Weekend.  To quote their email:  We’re also celebrating this special day by marking all of our books in our webstore off by 13%.  Simply visit our webstore and enter code PMMP13 upon checkout.  We have . . . a lot of books available.  Please consider picking up one or two or twelve.  The discount code expires on Sunday.

That’s thirteen percent off today through Sunday by using the code PMMP13 when checking out, but more to the point one of the books you can get discounted is my Stoker Award(R) nominated collection THE TEARS OF ISIS.  To go to the PMMP site press here.  And, after you’ve added TEARS to your shopping “cart,” to order two or a dozen other titles click “SHOP” at the top which will bring you to a page for browsing through additional selections.

Friday the Thirteenth proper has revealed more good news too, at least so far.  At least from the writing standpoint, with a Friday publication of THREE DROPS FROM A CAULDRON, for Samhain 2017, by Britain’s Three Drops Press.  Although largely a book of poetry, my ingredient in the inculcation is a very short story, “School Nights,”* originally published in GOTHIC BLUE BOOK IV:  THE FOLKLORE EDITION (Burial Day Books, 2014, cf. October 29 2014, et al.), about a young girl who . . . well . . . learns.  The book itself can be read for free by pressing here, with instructions also for purchase of a 74-page paperback edition for $7.32.

Then, speaking of money, another royalty has been received with again, as is my custom, neither publisher or amount revealed to avoid embarrassment.  Nevertheless, had it not been paid via Paypal anyway, the check would have covered the cost to mail it with some cash left over.

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*Oddly enough, the title seems to have been omitted from the contents page.  Look for the “School Nights” on page 22, following “Vampire Girls” and “House of Horrors.”

Who knows what Friday the Thirteenth will bring, but yesterday, Thursday the twelfth, was rather nice despite a gloomy, Octobery day.  The highlight, a first poetry acceptance for me by STAR*LINE new editor Vince Gotera, for a “horrorku” titled “Wet Work.”  Horrorku?  Well, it’s sort of supposed to be horror plus haiku though it’s really more just a three line poem with a vaguely 5-7-5 syllable count (mine is 5-7-4) on a horror subject, which in my case would more likely be epigrammatic, although not always.  But to the point, even if lacking walruses (cf. October 1) “Wet Work” does have a mermaid.

Then Thursday night brought the Bloomington Writers Guild co-sponsored “Second Thursday Players Pub Spoken Word Series” (cf. June 8, et al.) with, this time, a special reading performance of PREMIUM TAFT, a two-act play by Tom Trent, with musical interludes by Jason Fickel.  PREMIUM TAFT is, to read from the Facebook description, “[a] fictional time-traveling comedy about William Howard Taft’s whistle-stop presidential campaign appearance at the Mitchell Opera House in 1908 . . .  or maybe 1958?”  Or science fiction meets farce, in this case with an Indiana small-town ambience with grifters, politicos, greed, and rock ‘n’ roll.  And lots of fun.

This was followed by “open mic” presentations of which mine came in fourth of six, to an audience of about 15 people.  Noting that it had been a gloomy, Octobery day, ideal as a precursor for Halloween, I read four poems from VAMPS (A RETROSPECTIVE), “Night Child,” “La Méduse,” “Moonlight Swimming,” and “Chagrin du Vampire.”

A disturbing film isn’t one that gleefully stands with its arms outstretched to embrace buckets of blood.  A disturbing film is something else, something more — an experience that’s undeniably unsettling whilst it plays out, but even more powerful in the lingering sting it leaves behind.  A truly disturbing movie doesn’t slap you around in your seat on first viewing — instead, it burrows its way into your brain and replays in your thoughts for weeks at a time afterwards.

There are plenty of lists out there that attempt to gather the most disconcerting films of all time in one place, but here at We Got This Covered we’re gonna evade your textbook entries on this occasion — A SERBIAN FILM, HUMAN CENTIPEDE, CANNIBAL HOLOCAUST etc. — and go for a slightly different flavor.  These movies don’t simply disgust by serving as commendable pieces of exploitation cinema, but work in a rather different and more complex way to deeply, deeply disturb.  Watching them once will be more than enough. . .

So starts Gaz Lloyd’s “10 Deeply Disturbing Movies That You Need To Watch, But Only Once,” brought to us by WEGOTTHISCOVERED.COM.  To cut to the chase, to see the list for yourself press here (noting that a few of these specify the original movie, not the remake).  For myself, I think I’ve seen four of the ten, but will need to check further when I’m at home (I’m writing this at a library computer right now) to see if I still have two of the titles.  And, tonight, maybe watch AUDITION again?

Nah, maybe not.

As part of the HWA’s pre-Halloween run-up, three poems of mine have been published this month in a four-poet mini-anthology “Gallery of Poems” in the October issue of the HORROR WRITERS ASSOCIATION NEWSLETTER.  The poems, “Night Child,” “La Méduse,” and “Bon Appétit,” are all reprinted from my 2011 poetry collection VAMPS (A RETROSPECTIVE) along with two illustrations by Marge Simon, albeit erroneously attributed to me as well in the HWA NEWS.  Oops!  The poems themselves were also reprints when they appeared in VAMPS, with original attributions appearing in this current publication.

The HWA NEWSLETTER is, alas, a private publication so I’m not including a link to it here, but if you have friends in the HWA, by all means ask them to give you a look (as well as at those of the three other poets, Marge Simon, Jill Bauman, and Sandy DeLuca, with mine appearing last in the column).

A time of revelry and reversal, Saturnalia represents the breakdown of what has been deemed the natural order.  HYPERION AND THEIA’s inaugural volume wants stories and poetry that runs the gamut of genres and turns expectations on their heads.  Submit a fantastical murder-mystery set in the biggest carnival in Atlantis.  Wow us with a sweeping romance in space where gods and goddesses serve their creations after a bloody war. . . .

Such had been the call some months ago and, last December, came the acceptance (cf. December 9 2016).  My “epic” poem DREAMING SATURN, originally published in the anthology DARK DESTINY (White Wolf, 1994) would not only be in the inaugural volume, but tentatively would be set as the opening item.  A contract would follow.

So you know how it is.  Life intrudes, delays happen.  But then, yesterday:  Sorry for the long wait!  I have attached the final contract for you to sign.  I will contact you again on the 27th of October with the cover and other promotional material.  Suffice to say, the signed 8451b32b-e3c4-41cb-8f3e-7c6834708f13contract went back in the email this afternoon.

In other news, a run through the e-bookstores this morning unearthed a 33-percent discount for TOMBS:  A CHRONICLE OF LATTER-DAY TIMES OF EARTH on Barnes and Noble, at $9.99 — and that’s just the “official” price, with individual sellers’ new copies as inexpensive as $8.98.  There’s no indication how long these prices may last, so best take advantage soon!  Amazon, also, while listing the full price of $14.95 on its site, has several individual listings in the $10 to $11 range.  If interested, check out Barnes and Noble by pressing here; while Amazon can continue to be found, including several substantive reviews, by clicking TOMBS’ picture in the center column.




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