Posts Tagged ‘Historical Fiction’

No, this isn’t the one I mentioned June 16 as having received the questions for (though I’ve since sent the answers back); nor is it the one previewed on June 3, published in England on the 6th.  No, this is the interview mentioned May 8 for Grim and Grimmer Books’s DEADSTEAM anthology, conducted by Editor-Publisher Bryce Raffle, on such subjects as dreadpunk, historic fiction, Victorian funeral directors, and . . . well, you know.  If I’ve done it right, there’ll be mentions as well of THE TEARS OF ISIS and TOMBS: A CHRONICLE OF LATTER-DAY TIMES OF EARTH, the books I’m flogging for myself.  But the major point of this one is DEADSTEAM, the anthology due out later this fall in which my entry is “The Re-Possessed,” a saga of the funeral profession in 19th Century England (originally published in CEMETERY RIOTS by Elysium Press in 2016) and inspired by thoughts during a real-life memorial service.

This will be the fourth interview Editor Raffle has done of DEADSTEAM authors, previous ones having appeared on June 8, May 11, and February 25, and can be read by pressing here.  Or if you would like to read some of the others (presumably after mine, of course) the blog main page can be reached here.  Or, for mini-biographies of all DEADSTEAM authors, one can indulge by pressing here.

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DEADSTEAM is an anthology of dreadpunk, gaslamp, and dark steampunk. These are tales of the ghoulish and the gothic, chilling stories of haunted streets, of vampires and demons stalking the city from fog-drenched alleyways lit only by gas lamps.

17 chilling stories of the monsters lurking around every corner, the ghosts haunting the darkest streets of Victorian London, and the dead things crawling out of their graves to consume the flesh of the living.

And there you have it.  As for my part in this, I have a reprint originally published in CEMETERY RIOTS (Elysium Press, 2016; cf. September 3 2016, et al.) about a Victorian funeral directer and an incident from his early days in the business.  All right and proper like.  But now something new:  DEADSTEAM editor Bryce Raffle is featuring a series of interviews of some of the authors, of which mine has just been scheduled to appear on June 29.

So it’s something to look forward to for the summer, with the first of the interviews already posted on DEADSTEAM’s blog site for which one may press here.  Or for a reminder of DEADSTEAM itself (see also January 31, 16, 11), plus mini-biographies of more of the authors, please to press here.

Hark, the call:  It seems like everything’s finally settled down, fifty years into the twentieth century.  War is over.  The economy’s booming.  People are on a long exodus from the city.  It’s all settling.

But the occult lurks everywhere…

In sleepovers, as teenagers intone, “Light as a feather, stiff as a board.”  Or stare into the mirror, calling upon Mary.  They scream, convinced something looks back from inside the glass.

New music dominates the airwaves, discordant and wild.  They say it’s the devil’s music.

Strange lights dominate the sky.  Are they Russians?  Little Green Men?  Or something altogether stranger?

Perhaps things are not as settled as they feel. . .

So the job was to recall the 1950s with an occult flavor, the anthology to be called SOCKHOPS AND SEANCES.  Reprints would be okay.  It just so happened I had a story, “Bottles,” originally published in CROSSINGS (Double Dragon 2004; also reprinted in THE TEARS OF ISIS), set in 1958 Cambridge Massachusetts.  Historical accuracy would be insisted on (I lived in Cambridge from late 1959 to mid-1964).  But also with vampires, perhaps a bit chancy, or at least someone who believed in vampires combined with a period fear of Communism.  Still, why not, thought I?

And so today, May 1, International Labor Day, the reply came back from Editor Nicole Petit of publisher 18th Wall Productions:  Thank you so much for your submission and your patience as I deliberated on the stories sent in for SOCKHOPS AND SEANCES.  I am excited to tell you that we will be accepting “Bottles” into the anthology.

More to appear here as it becomes known.

Today brings some of the ancillary aspects of writing, the major bit being to go over proof sheets from CEMETERY RIOTS for “The Re-Possessed” (cf. May 5, et al.), my tale of the business side of Victorian funerals.  First, to be sure, one must find an honest undertaker — but then the bereaved must be certain that he is Cemetery Riothonest himself as well.  If things stay on schedule the book is expected later this month, so corrections, if any, should go back tonight.

Then, unrelated, an acceptance and contract came today, the latter of which must be read over, signed, and popped into the mail tomorrow.  For what, one may ask?  But here’s the odd part.  That must be a secret, at least for a few days in deference to other writers who may still be awaiting word.  Which is fair enough.  So stay tuned and, in time, all will be revealed.

And then, speaking of timetables, I now have an expected release date for “Bubba Claus Conquers the Martians” and Upper Rubber Boots Books’s THE MUSEUM OF ALL THINGS AWESOME AND THAT GO BOOM (cf. March 17, et al.).  “Bubba Claus,” of course, is a Christmas story — in this case one that also has zombies — and so, for visions of sleighs and snow (or at least a space shuttle) in the height of summer, it’s slated for publication next month on July 26.

Today’s email brought an update from Cohesion Press for BLURRING THE LINE (cf. March 23, February 7), the Australian anthology that asks the question:  “Do you really know what’s real and what isn’t?”  According to Editor Marty Young, “[r]eal life kind of got in the way for a few months,” but noblurringw it’s on schedule for publication September or October this year.  And, as another nod to real life, the book will be dedicated to recently passed on, on July 11,  author and four-time Stoker Award® winner Tom Piccirilli, “who contributed with a pretty hard hitting story that’s incredibly close to home.”  Also the table of contents should be finalized soon, and will be announced here as soon as I know it.

My part here is called “The Good Work,” a treatise on witchcraft in 1850s London.  Or is that witch-hunting?  And, along with a call for updated author bios and pictures, there will also be a limited hardcover edition signed by the authors, more on which will be announced as well as details become known.




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