Posts Tagged ‘Astronomy’

Well, sort of, kind of, maybe in the ballpark, but science fiction writers and fans be alert.  More possibly Earthlike, possibly life-friendly planets, or at least their discovery,  may be on the way according to Tom Ward in “Our View of the Cosmos Is About to Get a Tremendous Upgrade” on FUTURISM.COM, courtesy of Steph P. Bianchini and THE EARTHIAN HIVEMIND.  If curious, press here.  And, if even curiouser (okay, so I’ve watched a couple of ALICE IN WONDERLAND movies lately — warning:  avoid the Johnny Depp version of ALICE THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS if you possibly can), for some background via THE EARTHIAN HIVEMIND itself, check into “Exoplanet Update — Where Are We Now?” by pressing here.

And here’s a second post for Monday, but this one’s for free stuff, the only penalty being a willingness to step outside in the late hours of night.  Vampire time, yes — with the websize-a357cf1e28bec764e18efb0fde8c7576neighborhood werewolves’ howls in the distance.  But this is different, especially for science fiction fans perhaps but also for all with a sense of wonder.  Wonder and awe.

The article is courtesy of UPWORTHY.COM by Heather Libby, “19 Amazing Things You Don’t Want to Miss in the Night Sky in 2016.”  And one need but press here to read, see, and enjoy.

A very pleasant early May outing began with the month’s Bloomington Writers Guild “First Sunday Prose Reading” (see April 6, February 1, et al.), co-sponsored by Boxcar Books.  Featured readers were Alyce Miller, award-winning author and Indiana University Graduate MFA program teacher and Director of Admissions, reading humorous essays on death in California and, having moved from there to here, the difficulties of becoming a “Hoosier”; poet, essayist, and MFA graduate Doug Paul Case with a series of “little prose poem micro-essay things,” humorous and ironic; and incoming THE INDIANA REVIEW Editor-in-Chief Peter Kispert with a first person story-essay on failed aspiring actors and reconstructed Netflix FATAL ATTRACTIONS episodes “where exotic animal owners are victimized by their pets.”  Although running late, the audience stayed for five open mike presentations that followed, of which mine, third in the lineup, was a recent as yet unsold story, “Medusa Steps Out,” about . . . well . . . an exotic animal owner of sorts who is also victimized by her pets (although, unlike the onlookers in this case, survives).

This was also the last “First Sunday” reading of the 2014-2015 season, the series now going on summer hiatus until August 2.  Other presentations will also be winding down as the month continues, but even now plans are also developing for 20111holst6, including a possible multi-disciplinary joining with the Bloomington Symphony Orchestra for a concert next February.  Along these lines, Writers Guild members had also been offered comp tickets for a production this evening of Gustav Holst’s THE PLANETS, Op. 32, by the Symphony Orchestra (joined at the haunting end of the final movement, “Neptune, the Mystic,” by the Bloomington Chamber Singers Women’s Chorus).  This, too, was a mixed media performance, accompanied by a slide show of the planets with NASA and ESA images put together and introduced by Indiana University Astronomy Professors Gabriel Lubell and Richard Durisen, thus perhaps to help us, the writers, stretch out imaginative wings.

In any event, it was a great show.




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