Archive for the ‘Horror’ Category

Two quick items, the first that Gehenna and Hinnom’s YEAR’S BEST BODY HORROR 2017 ANTHOLOGY (see September 25, et al.) arrived in yesterday’s street mail just in time for a glance through on Halloween, which seemed sort of proper.  It is a big book, as noted before just from the contents, with my story in it a reprint from some years back titled “Flesh,” about a man who wishes to gain weight.  For more on YEAR’S BEST BODY HORROR 2017 one can press here.

Then this morning I came across a short tale on Carrie Ann Golden’s A WRITER & HER ADOLESCENT MUSE blog, “A Halloween Haunt Story,” which is well in the spirit and can be read here.  But the thing is, then scroll down to the end and at the right is a link to “Author Interview:  James Dorr” — a rerun, as it were, of Carrie’s last year’s just-after-Halloween (cf. November 14 2016) interview of . . . moi.  So for still valid info on me, for those who may have missed it, on the not yet out TOMBS:  A CHRONICLE OF LATTER-DAY TIMES OF EARTH as well as THE TEARS OF ISIS, themes found in my writing, characterization, an excerpt from TOMBS, and other such lore, just give it a click as well.*

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*As now it happens (November 2) that the links below the story may change from day to day, mine no longer being in the slot.  So, if still interested in Carrie’s year ago interview of me, a direct link is here.

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Remember Aimée and the Casket Girls?  My original story (cf. April 7 2014, et al.) was based on a New Orleanian urban legend which, bursting with ideas, has resulted in several additional stories (March 6 2016, April 28 2015, . . .) the last of which probably has not yet been written.  But there are many urban legends, some familiar, some possibly less so, so for our run-up to Halloween (having skipped a day Sunday — well, so it goes) herewith, by Steven Casale on THE-LINE-UP.COM, “Trick or Treat: 6 Creepy Halloween Urban Legends.”  But the thing is it doesn’t end there.  Four of the six in fact include links to related topics — for instance, number four with “The Origins Behind 9 Terrifying American Urban Legends” — and for click bait diehards some of these may in turn contain links of their own!

Therefore if you dare (or have time on your hands for some exploration), for six urban legends . . . and more press here.

No need for a picture here on the posting, plenty are waiting for those who click the link.  And so for Saturday, three-days to go before Halloween, we have “Inside Germany’s Creepy American-Inspired Halloween Parks” by Nick Kirkpartick with photographs by Tomasz Lazar, on WASHINGTONPOST.COM.  And if that weren’t enough, watch for the links within to other Halloween-themed features.  For more, for the brave, your journey starts here.

Then also a quick reminder:  For those who receive THE HORROR TREE’s “Weekly Posts From the Horror Tree” roundup, be sure to scroll down to the bottom of today’s edition where their interviewee this time is . . . me.  Or scroll down here to October 22 where you’ll find the link when it first came out.

It’s Halloween, so let’s celebrate by reading some spooky stories available online for free.  You have no excuse not to take a look at every single one of these.  And hey, maybe buy a couple of the books linked below each entry.  You can’t go wrong with any of them.

Thus begins “The 20 Best Horror Stories Available Online for Free” via LITREACTOR.COM (as is also the illustration), by Max Booth III, and note please his mention that every entry also links to a book you can buy.  Max may be better known for Perpetual Motion Machine Publishing, his company, and bringer among other things of (*ahem*) my collection THE TEARS OF ISIS.  For the latter, one can click on its picture in the center column, but back to the point, Max has listed a number of stories, some of which I’ve read, some of which not (but am likely to soon for my own Halloween pleasure), and all of which you might find worthwhile as well.

For more, press here.

Lish McBride on TOR.COM, began it this way:  At first I thought, I’m not going to do a Halloween post.  After all, what can be more terrifying than this year?

Nothing.  Absolutely nothing.  2017 jumped the shark a long time ago in regards to how mind-numbingly horrifying it has been.  I can’t think of a worse time.  (Except maybe high school.)

But then she recalled that horror sometimes helps in forgetting, if for a moment, one’s own aversions — and humor, most definitely, can as well.  Thus another list was born, to be reported here — “Necessary Whimsy:  Vampire Bunnies and Other Weird-But-Fun Halloween Reads,” with one caveat, perhaps, that some (most?) are geared to young adult readers or even children.  But does not Halloween bring out the inner child in us too?

Let all be revealed by pressing here.

The word is out!  Gehenna and Himmon’s one-week Halloween sale — October 25 through October 31 — has started today with prices slashed to 99 cents per publication (cf. October 16).  As anticipated, the sale will apply only to electronic editions, but even at that bargains abound.  Also, HINNOM MAGAZINE 003, scheduled to be out on Halloween day, cannot be included but, in Editor/Publisher C.P. Dunphey’s words, “to make up for this, the magazine will have a promo during November, leading up to the YEAR’S BEST TRANSHUMAN SF 2017 ANTHOLOGY.”

Titles that are included are HINNOM MAGAZINE issues 001 and 002, YEAR’S BEST BODY HORROR 2017 ANTHOLOGY (including *ahem* my story “Flesh”), GEHENNA CLASSICS:  H.P. LOVECRAFT Volume 1, and GEHENNA CLASSICS:  PHILIP K. DICK Volume 1.  Or to read it on G & H’s own site, including live links to all sale titles, press here — but remember, again, regular prices go back in effect after Halloween!

Today brings an email plus PDF proof from Editor Vince Gotera of the latest STAR*LINE for Fall 2017.  Please proof your piece(s) . . . as well as your listing(s) in the table of contents.  Could you please get back to me with any corrections ASAP?  In my case the page of interest is the twelfth with, sharing poems by Christine Sng and by R. Mac Jones, tucked neatly in at the bottom right my three-liner “Wet Work” (cf. October 13).  And this time, aha!, there was an error, one of the sort that would sneak past a computer spell-checker (whereas, ironically, the correct word might not).

So not to worry, I’ve sent back the change along with mailing and payment details.  More to come when the published issue arrives.

Nine days to Halloween — how time does fly!  So to anticipate the upcoming holiday, THE HORROR TREE has just posted an interview of me, a long one by Ruschelle Dillon which even includes a question, with picture, about the Goth Cat Triana (with mention as well of dear departed Wednesday).  Did you know both of them have their own web pages (look for their names under “Pages” to the right)?  Captain Kirk or Jean Luc Picard?  (Yes, that’s one of the questions, but how do the “Casket Girls” fit in?)  Meldings of horror, science fiction, and romance.  Art and Death. Which TOMBS tale was “honorable mentioned” in Circlet Press’s BEST FANTASTIC EROTICA 2007?  Inspirational kitties.  Novels-in-stories.  And what does Poe’s “Poetic Principle” have to do with it all?

These and more — you know the routine!  Some things secret, some better well known, but all of them open for readers’ enjoyment by pressing here.

We may remember Heidi Angell.  To quote myself from June 9 this year, one of several posts linking to Heidi’s blog (cf. that date, et al.):  “It began innocently enough with a Meet the Author Interview.”  So begins Heidi Angell’s entry on her blog, AN ANGELL’S LIFE OF BOOKISH GOODNESS, complete with a link to the interview itself (cf., also, January 10), followed by a note and links for the three guest posts also published on TOMBS over the past several months (cf. May 18, et al.).  But that’s not all, even before that Heidi has posted a video of her first impressions which, by way of a preview, you can check out here (or, again, the link is there as well for you).  But then comes the main event, for which I can just say “Wow!”, Heidi Angell’s review of TOMBS:  A CHRONICLE OF LATTER-DAY TIMES OF EARTH, for which please press here.  There’s yet another item, though, in AN ANGELL’S LIFE, a reading of excerpts or stories from books to give would-be readers an even greater impression, under the aegis of STORY TIME.  An audio-visual lagniappe, if one will.  So Heidi and I selected one story that she might read from section III, “Intimations of Future Disaster,” a fairly short tale giving some of the TOMBS world’s background within the love story of Ipanema and Partimar, titled “Carnival of the Animals.”

“Carnival of the Animals” was first published as a stand-alone story in the literary ezine LENOX AVENUE for July-August 2005.  To quote its subtitle:  Two by two they passed through the New City, these the beasts of the Southern and Eastern wastes — and not just beasts only.  And as they went their way, there seemed so many that some questioned what was left.

For the story, press here.

Well, life in the far future as depicted in TOMBS:  A CHRONICLE OF LATTER-DAY TIMES OF EARTH is, to be sure, not exactly cheery.  And Amazon’s keywords do include the term “Dystopian,” as well as “Horror.”  But here’s a description from Erin Roberts’s “How to Tell If You’re Living in a Dystopia — And Why It Matters,” from TOR.COM:  Dystopian fiction, which comes from the Ancient Greek words “dys” (bad) and “topia” (place), lives up to its name by featuring worlds in which reality is cruel, suffering is extreme, and hope seems pointless.  But not every horrible place is a dystopia — the trope usually features a world in which society itself is the problem — and not every dystopia is horrible in the same way.  The social order is broken, but how?  The system has been corrupted, but by whom?  These futures may be bleak, but they are not interchangeable.  And so the question, are troubles in TOMBS primarily that of a social order (or orders) gone wrong, or is it more just a physically lousy place to live?  Or some kind of combination of both?

Ms. Roberts suggests four questions one could ask to determine whether one’s milieu is dystopic or not, mostly having to do with societal origins and hopes of relief, but as some of the comments after may suggest those might not be the only criteria.  But see for yourself by pressing here.  While as for TOMBS, for more information click on its picture in the center column, read the reviews, and perhaps buy a copy.




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