Blurring the Line Arrives at Last from Australian Voyage; Top Movie Horror Films Ranked by Decade

Another arrival in my groaning mailbox, BLURRING THE LINE (see June 12 this year; December 3, November 26 2015, et al) is finally here!  Published in Australia by Cohesion Press, BLURRING THE LINE, with Editor Marty Young, asks us the question of when fiction starts and reality ends.  That is, these are stories that are fiction, aren’t they?  But tales nevertheless of the kind that just might, possibly, maybe, like wasn’t there something like that last week on the Discovery Channel, be true.  And so, my action in the anthology is blurringtheline“The Good Work,” of young Christmas carolers in a Dickensian London who actually have a different agenda, getting invited in people’s houses to hunt for witches.  There are witches, aren’t there — at least in people’s beliefs back then?

All in all there are 20 stories, arranged in sections interspersed with factual essays.  For more, one can check the Amazon listing, including several detailed reviews, by pressing here.

Then second, consider this from MONKEYSFIGHTINGROBOTS.COM:  “Ranking The Top 3 Horror Films From EVERY Decade Since The 1920’s” by EJ Moreno, brought to our attention courtesy of Jamie Carpenter on Facebook.  I wouldn’t say I necessarily agree with all choices, or rankings, but given his criteria (which I do agree with, reminiscent in a way, I might add, to discussions when I was on the jury for the HWA’s 2012 special award for Best Vampire Novel in the 100 years since Bram Stoker’s death, cf. April 3, 2 2012, et al.) I think he’s made a noble attempt.  Or, to let EJ explain it himself, “[t]his list was tough to create because limiting myself to only 3 movies over the span of ten years within each decade is maddening.  Also, where do you begin ranking films?  So I attempted to form this list by including films based on the film itself, the quality, the legacy, the impact to the genre, and audience reception.”

Agree yourself?  Disagree?  Or just to find out which ones you’ve seen (or not yet seen) press here.

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  1. A number of earlier ones I either saw or saw clips from but there was no Chain Saw Massacre or Silence of the Lambs or Turn of the Screw or the “They’re HERE” movie, POLTERGEIST or Damion or Rosemary’s Baby or Children of the Corn or The Lottery –(Twilight zone?) among other?

    wonder why?

    • I question Plan 9 for the ’50s instead of, say, Them unless he sees Godzilla standing in for the “beware nuclear testing” theme (but still G. was big to begin with while the ants are giant mutants). Silence of the Lambs is there for the ’90s, though I could see someone missing it since I think it was marketed more as crime. But as he says, it’s hard to make choices (especially with the most recent — with the older you know which ones have survived). I might question Creature from the Black Lagoon too, though he might have a point with it as marking the end of an era, but I would have liked to see Roger Corman’s original Little Shop of Horrors (or, for horror absurdism/comedy maybe Arsenic and Old Lace?). Of these the only I haven’t seen are Hour of the Wolf (but bought a copy just a few weeks ago, wasn’t so easy to find, I guess, so am anticipating it when I have a quiet night and a desire to concentrate), Funny Games, and I’m not sure if I’ve seen Evil Dead 2.

      • I agree, Jim. I didn’t see and do not ever want to see Chainsaw Massacre or Nightmare on Elm Street, Chuckie, etc. –that’s too banal and icky –horror for the sake of blood, guts, and more blood and loads of screams. Not my cup of tea.

  2. I dislike the Saw films myself, as possibly crossing the line between horror and sadism, but on the other hand I applaud his inclusion of Martyrs (although the film is hard to watch) and think the Audition is at least important too — but, adding Saw which, as the sole American film he has for the 2000s, was probably seen by a lot more readers may tell us something about the decade in general. (You reading this, George W. Bush? 🙂 )




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